6 Adjectives to Describe Food

Food is an extremely important part of the Italian lifestyle. You could say it’s one of the most important aspects! With this in mind, the Team at Scrambled Eggs English School in Milan have put together six awesome adjectives that you can use to describe different types of food and their texture.

First up on our list is mushy. Think baby food, or mashed potato!

Up next is stale. If food has become stale, it is normally no longer good to eat.

Next on the list is chewy. This word is used to describe food that is difficult to chew.

Another fantastic adjective is crispy. Think roasted chicken! In fact, crispy is the opposite to mushy.

The penultimate word for today’s blog is creamy. Think soup, or risotto!

This list wouldn’t be complete without this last word: greasy. This word perfectly sums up how a Full English Breakfast should be.

Now, that you have these 6 fantastic adjectives to describe food, visit your nearest restaurant, order some food and start describing it! Happy eating!

Don’t forget to comment below and tell us which adjective you like the best!

Last but not least, if you have enjoyed reading this article, click here to read some of our other blogs and continue learning English.

Spontaneous Decisions | Listening Exercise

There are a number of ways to talk about the future in English. It all depends on what exactly you want to say about the future. In English, we used the simple future in the following situations: to predict a future event, to give orders, to give an invitation (in the interrogative form) as well as to express a spontaneous decision.

The simple future is formed of two parts: will + verb (without to).

In this mini-grammar lesson by Scrambled Eggs English school in Milan we will be looking at using the simple future to make decisions in the moment.

Imagine, you are at home and you hear the house phone ring:

Or, you are walking down the corridor at work and you see your colleague trip and spill coffee all over the floor:

Another scenario could be, you don’t feel very well and your partner cooks dinner for you:

Now it is time to put your new grammar knowledge to the test! Try this listening exercise – you will hear two people talking about their friend’s birthday and planning a spontaneous surprise party.

Planning A Party | Listening Exercise

Test your English listening knowledge with the following exercise!

How did you do? How many times did you hear the simple future used to make an immediate decision? Click here to try out some of our other listening exercises.

Prepositions of Time | Esercizio Inglese

Prepositions are always a bit of a struggle when learning a language, especially since they tend to differ from one language to another.

How are your prepositions in English? Today’s blog takes on the infamous prepositions of time, which can be split into 3 simple all-encompassing prepositions: in, on and at. Is this topic completely new to you? Have no fear! Scrambled Eggs English School in Milan has a team of Native English Speakers to accommodate your every need.

So, which preposition is used for which time?

We use in for non-specific times such as months, years, decades and long periods of time. For example “in January,” “in 2009” and “in the future.”

We use on for specific days and dates, such as days of the week, days of the year and dates. For example “on Monday,” “on January 21st” and “on New Year’s Eve.”

Finally, we use at for the time, holidays and festivals as well as specific timeframes. For example “at 7:00 p.m.,” “at Christmas” and “at sunrise.”

For more information, have a look at the below graphic about this very topic:

Have you got it? Do you think you’re ready to put your knowledge to the test? Well, you’re in luck; we’ve prepared an exercise just for you!

Prepositions of Time

Type the correct preposition in the gap.

How did you find it? If it was too difficult, then feel free to try it again! Otherwise, have a look at some of our other English quizzes and start improving your English now!

LINK: http://scrambledeggsinglese.it/category/a2/