Spontaneous Decisions | Listening Exercise

There are a number of ways to talk about the future in English. It all depends on what exactly you want to say about the future. In English, we used the simple future in the following situations: to predict a future event, to give orders, to give an invitation (in the interrogative form) as well as to express a spontaneous decision.

The simple future is formed of two parts: will + verb (without to).

In this mini-grammar lesson by Scrambled Eggs English school in Milan we will be looking at using the simple future to make decisions in the moment.

Imagine, you are at home and you hear the house phone ring:

Or, you are walking down the corridor at work and you see your colleague trip and spill coffee all over the floor:

Another scenario could be, you don’t feel very well and your partner cooks dinner for you:

Now it is time to put your new grammar knowledge to the test! Try this listening exercise – you will hear two people talking about their friend’s birthday and planning a spontaneous surprise party.

Planning A Party | Listening Exercise

Test your English listening knowledge with the following exercise!

How did you do? How many times did you hear the simple future used to make an immediate decision? Click here to try out some of our other listening exercises.

Top 5 Weirdest Laws: US Edition | Grammar Exercise

Today’s mini-lesson from the Team at Scrambled Eggs English School in Milan is about how to talk about laws.

The USA is a vast and diverse country. Each state in fact has their very own local laws. It’s hardly surprisingly then that over the years strange laws have been passed. We’ve put together a list of the top 5 weirdest laws that still exist in the USA today.

Number 1: In Sant Antonio, Texas, flirting is against the law!

Number 2: If you are found stealing soap in Arizona, you must wash yourself until the bar of soap has been completely used up!

Number 3: If you have a moustache in Eureka, Nevada, you are not allowed to kiss a woman!

Number 4: In Indiana, it is illegal to attend a public event or even use public transport within 4 hours of eating onions or garlic.

Number 5: In Gainesville, Georgia (USA), you are not allowed to eat fried chicken in any way other than by hand.

These laws are definitely quite interesting and funny! But, what language can we used when we talk about the law?

When describing what we can and can’t do, we can use the verbs let and allow. What’s the difference? Well, allow is more formal than let, but aside from that they both have a similar meaning to give permission to.

Importantly, however, they are structured differently:

Check out our exercise below to practice using let and allow:

Top 5 Weirdest Laws: US Edition

Complete the sentences using either let or allow.

How did you do? If you found the exercise difficult, pop by our school. We have a great team of native English teachers that are always happy to help.

Would you like to study more English? Click here to read about the top 5 weirdest laws from the UK!

ESL Business English | Esercizio Ascolto Inglese

It’s time for another mini-grammar lesson! Once again, the Team at Scrambled Eggs School in Milan have created some great exercises to help you practice and improve your Business English skills. Today’s topic is going to.

Have you ever wondered how to talk about the different tasks that you do at work as well as explain upcoming projects? Our Team of experienced, Native English Teachers are here to help and make sure that you are ready for every situation!

To talk about intentions, plans decided before the moment of speaking that will happen in the future, as well as predictions we use going to.

Structure: verb to be + going to + infinitive.

Examples:

  • Are you meeting the client today? No, I am going to meet them next Monday at 13:00. = The meeting has already been planned and will take place next week.
  • Next week is going to be a very busy week in the office because our new product launches. = They think next will be busy because I know that the company’s new product will launch.

Now, it is time to put your English listening skills to the test! This listening is most suitable for B1 learners. Listen to the following audio about three different work-related stories and try to extract some information. If you would like to do some pre-listening exercises click here.

After you have listened to the audio once, twice or as many times as you need, test your English listening knowledge with the following exercise!

Next week at work

After listening to the audio above, read the following text and fill in the blanks with the correct answers.

How did you do? Did you find it a bit challenging? Feel free to try again! If you ready to move on and learn some more English, then click here to access some of our other quizzes and articles.