5 Adjectives to Describe Significant Moments

Do you ever try to tell a story in a different language and realize that your audience can’t appreciate the significance of the events, because you don’t have the right words to express your feelings? Get ready to learn some new words that we hope can be a huge help to you in the future!

Did something incredible amazing happen to you this summer? Do you have some important memories from your past that you can’t sufficiently describe in English? This is Scrambled Eggs’ list of the best five adjectives to describe very significant and notable moments in your life:

1. Pivotal

pivotal adjective

2. Life-changing

life-changing adjective

3. Jaw-dropping

jaw-dropping adjective

4. Unforgettable

unforgettable adjective

5. Fulfilling

fulfilling adjective

If you are confident that you have understood these words, then you are ready to try our Scrambled Eggs vocabulary test:

Choose the perfect adjective for each sentence:

  1. Finding new jobs or new hobbies can often be completely ____________________.
  2. Improving your fluency in a foreign language might be ____________________ if you’re hoping for a promotion.
  3. Often when you visit a new city you find something ____________________ that leaves you speechless.
  4. One of the most ____________________ moments of my youth was receiving an award at school to recognise all my hard work.
  5. Pretty much everyone had at least one ____________________ holiday with their family when they were young.

Which of our adjectives could you use to describe these situations:

  1. Arriving at a new office for the first time.
  2. Becoming a parent.
  3. Getting fired.
  4. Visiting a new country.
  5. Witnessing a crime.

Post your answers in the comments section below, and let us know what you think about these 5 adjectives!

BREXIT – What is it? | Reading Comprehension

On Thursday 23rd June 2016, the United Kingdom (UK) voted in a referendum to decide whether or not to remain a member of the European Union (EU). Over three years later, MPs (Members of Parliament) are still debating how to successfully implement this decision. The big question is, however, why did the citizens of the UK vote to leave in the first place? The Team at Scrambled Eggs School in Milan have a put together a short outline of all the facts.

‘Brexit’ is the term coined to describe the UK’s decision to leave the EU. The word Brexit is in fact a shortened version of ‘British Exit.’ In June 2016, 72.2% of voters went to their Polling Station (the place where you are registered to vote) to cast their vote on whether or not the UK should remain in the EU. The results were not only unexpected, but extremely close, with 51.9% of people voting to leave and 48.1% voting to remain! Brexit evidently divided the nation.

What encouraged people to vote the way that they did? In the months leading up to the vote, both supporters and opponents of the EU referendum led various campaigns to outline what the pros and cons would be if we decided to leave or remain in the EU. Here are the for and against arguments briefly outlined.

The For Argument

The push to leave the EU was advocated mostly by the UK Independence Party who argued that Britain’s participation in the EU restricted the country. The Party’s main arguments centred around: regaining border control and reclaiming business rights. Additionally, they argued that the high EU membership fees could be used use to benefit the UK, in particular to fund the NHS (the UK’s healthcare system).

The Against Argument

The Conservative Party, including David Cameron, the Party leader and the Prime Minister at the time, were strongly in favour of remaining in the EU. Their arguments against leaving were predominately related to business benefits; being a part of the EU allows the UK to participate in the single market and therefore benefit from economic strength and security. In addition, they argued that immigration helps develop the workforce and fuels public service projects.

In response to the results of the EU referendum, the UK invoked Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty on 29th March 2017. In doing so, the UK made its break from the EU official. The UK then had two years to negotiate a departure with the other member states and was officially due to leave on 29th March 2019. However, British MPs failed to come to a unanimous decision and the Article 50 process was extended to 12th April 2019 and then subsequently, a further six months, to 31st October 2019. As things stand, the UK is set to leave the EU on 31st October, unless a withdrawal agreement is ratified by both the UK and the EU before this date; as a result of which, the UK would leave before the deadline.

Until the UK’s exit becomes legal, the UK is still subject to EU laws. What will happened between now and then is completely up in the air. There is support for a second referendum, talks of extending the October deadline and even advocates for a no-deal Brexit (to leave the EU immediately and without any agreements in place). At the moment, the UK’s future in the EU is unknown.

Did you enjoy reading this article? Test your reading skills by completing our comprehension quiz below.

BREXIT – What is it? | Reading Comprehension

Either select an answer from the options or type it in the box.

Would you like to continue practicing learning English? Click here to access some of our other reading comprehensions.

Even if / Even though – English Grammar Exercise

In today’s post blog post we’re going to go over two phrases that can be a bit tricky for English language learners. Are you ready to learn and improve with us?

Do you know the difference between ‘even if‘ and ‘even though‘ in English? It’s a pretty tough part of the English language, but fortunately for you the native-speaker language teachers here at our language school in Milan are ready to help out! Have a look at the rules below and then try our latest Scrambled Eggs grammar quiz – you’ll be an expert in no time!

Even if vs. Even though

So, if it were raining you could say “Even though it’s raining right now, I’m going to the park to play football with my mates“, but if it were a sunny morning you would say “Even if it rains this afternoon I’m going to the park to play football with the guys“.

Have you got it? Try writing a couple of examples if you’re still not sure. Then, when you’re feeling confident, click on the link below for the quiz to test yourself.

Even if vs. Even though quiz

When you’ve read the explanation at the top of the page, choose the correct answers in the following quiz on even if/even though.

If it still seems a bit tricky, have you considered coming to our Milan language school for a lesson? Our qualified and experience native-speaker instructors are ready to jump into action to help you with whatever problems you may be having with English. If you haven’t studied with us before, you can book a free introductory Level Test here: http://scrambledeggsinglese.it/prenota-test-di-valutazione/

If you found this blog post useful and you’d like to find more tips and exercises, check out some more of our material here: http://scrambledeggsinglese.it/scrambled-eggs-blog/.