Songs to Help You Learn the English 3rd Conditional

As we know, most songs are stories. Hence, the majority deal with events that happened in the past. When discussing regrets or how we wish things had turned out in the past in English, we usually need to utilise the 3rd conditional.

Listen for some examples in these songs:

Grace Jones – Everybody Hold Still

Let’s start with the iconic Grace Jones. Check out the 1st lines of this song:

I knew I shouldn’t have left the apartment
I knew I should’ve stayed in watching TV

And later on we find an even better example:

I could’ve left all my cash and taken a credit card
I should’ve said, “Don’t wear no jewelery you’re looking fine”
If I’d ran back for the phone…

Adele – Rolling In The Deep

Who doesn’t love Adele? I bet you can’t find a single person who doesn’t start tapping their feet when this song comes on… and guess what? There are some great examples of the 3rd conditonal!

We could’ve had it all
We could’ve had it all (tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep)

Adele – If It Hadn’t Been For Love

Yeah it’s more Adele, but just look at that song title – a perfect 3rd conditonal example! And the song is absolutely stuffed with them. Adele’s trying to sound as American as she can here, hence her use of “woulda” instead of “would have”.

Never woulda hitch hiked to Birmingham
If it hadn’t been for love
Never woulda caught the train to Louisiana
If it hadn’t been for love

Check out another of our Adele articles if you’re fan of her music! http://scrambledeggsinglese.it/adele-teaches-phrasal-verbs/

Taylor Swift – Should’ve Said No

Another real heavyweight of modern music, Taylor ended her argument with Spotify back in 2017 and we’ve been listening ever since. Third conditional in the title? Check. Third conditional examples in the song lyrics? Check. Sit back, listen and enjoy:

You should’ve said, “No”
You should’ve gone home
You should’ve thought twice before you let it all go
You should’ve known that word, about what you did with her, would get back to me


The Hollies – Why Didn’t You Believe

Taking a step back in time, here’s an example from British pop/rock group the Hollies who were incredibly famous in the 60s and 70s.

He asked for you to love one another
You turned your back and played on with your games
If you had listened, you would have discovered
The Bible would have told a different story

Journey – It Could Have Been You

Formed in San Francisco in 1973, Journey are best know for their smash hit song ‘Don’t Stop Believin’’. However, there’s so much more to the band than just that one hit. This one’s a classic, and pretty useful for our English grammar purposes too!

I…can’t wait all my life, on a street of broken dreams
It could have been you my love (where are you now)
Oh I…still wonder if you remember the night
It could have been you (where are you now)
Should have been you my love (where are you now)
It could have been you my love, (where are you now)

Gloria Gaynor – I Will Survive

If someone tells you they don’t know this song, then either they’re deaf or a liar. It’s listed on both Rolling Stone magazine’s “the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” and Billboard magazine’s “All-Time Hot 100”. While it involves only one example of a third conditional, this song’s just too good to be exclused from our list:

I should have changed that stupid lock, I should have made you leave your key
If I’d known for just one second you’d be back to bother me

So there you are! Proof that music is good for languages as well as for the soul. If you want more examples of how you can use music to help you with conditionals, check out these other pages from your Scrambled Eggs team:

Scrambled Eggs Inglese first conditinal
http://bit.ly/2GPQ7SL
Scrambled Eggs Inglese second conditional
http://bit.ly/2NbjwYy

5 Different Ways To Say ‘Cold’ In English

Winters in Milan can get really cold, but are you able to describe the different temperature levels in English? Scrambled Eggs has prepared 5 useful adjectives to help you chat about cold weather, so you can practice and improve your English. After all, the weather is the number 1 topic of conversation in Britain!

Crisp winter morning

Crisp weather? Sounds nice! It might not be the most ideal when it comes to weather, but for the most part we look at it with a positive light. What about when it’s a little colder though:

It’s still not too bad when it’s nippy, but things are getting progressively colder when compared to “crisp.” So why don’t we kick it up a notch and make things even colder, with “chilly”:

Hot drink weather

OK, now we start getting serious. And what is even colder than the discomfort of chilly? Probably as cold as it gets here in Milan:

Very cold weather in Milan

And finally, for the coldest days of the year, when you just long for summer, even if here in Milan it gets so hot that it’s torture:

Freezing weather synonyms

And there you go! Now you can chat with any native speaker and compare the weather in Milan with the weather abroad!

Leave a comment below describing the weather today if you want to practise, and check us out on Facebook and Instagram: @scrambledeggsenglish

Phrasal Verbs for your New Year’s Resolutions

Apparently about 60% of people make new year’s resolutions, however only around 8% are successful in achieving them. Here are some useful verbs from your Scrambled Eggs team to help you describe what you’re trying this year.

Firstly, how about starting something new this year? Maybe something you’ve wanted to do for a long time?

learn new skills by accident

How do you feel about picking up something new? Too busy? Then try this one:

practice and improve old skills

If you’re too lazy to improve or develop talents, then there’s always Netflix for when you have some free time:

catch up on missed episodes of Netflix

Some people are more organised than others, and possibly tidier than them too, but everyone has to face the same problems of junk at some point in the year:

get rid of the junk in your apartment or office

Now let’s have a look at one of the most common new year’s resolutions – starting a diet:

cut down on activities for the new year

New year = new you? Then how about focusing on the way you interact with other people around you:

get along better with colleagues

What do you think about starting a diet? If it seems like a good idea now, just remember that you can’t quit after just a few weeks:

See new year's resolutions through to the end

And there you go! 7 new phrasal verbs for you to use when you speak English. Think you can use these verbs in conversation? Try chatting with a friend about your new year’s resolutions, or leave a comment below about what you’re trying this year!

If you want to practice them a bit more, have a go at the quiz below:

Phrasal verbs for new year's resolutions

Test your knowledge of the phrasal verbs!