5 Adjectives to Describe Significant Moments

Do you ever try to tell a story in a different language and realize that your audience can’t appreciate the significance of the events, because you don’t have the right words to express your feelings? Get ready to learn some new words that we hope can be a huge help to you in the future!

Did something incredible amazing happen to you this summer? Do you have some important memories from your past that you can’t sufficiently describe in English? This is Scrambled Eggs’ list of the best five adjectives to describe very significant and notable moments in your life:

1. Pivotal

pivotal adjective

2. Life-changing

life-changing adjective

3. Jaw-dropping

jaw-dropping adjective

4. Unforgettable

unforgettable adjective

5. Fulfilling

fulfilling adjective

If you are confident that you have understood these words, then you are ready to try our Scrambled Eggs vocabulary test:

Choose the perfect adjective for each sentence:

  1. Finding new jobs or new hobbies can often be completely ____________________.
  2. Improving your fluency in a foreign language might be ____________________ if you’re hoping for a promotion.
  3. Often when you visit a new city you find something ____________________ that leaves you speechless.
  4. One of the most ____________________ moments of my youth was receiving an award at school to recognise all my hard work.
  5. Pretty much everyone had at least one ____________________ holiday with their family when they were young.

Which of our adjectives could you use to describe these situations:

  1. Arriving at a new office for the first time.
  2. Becoming a parent.
  3. Getting fired.
  4. Visiting a new country.
  5. Witnessing a crime.

Post your answers in the comments section below, and let us know what you think about these 5 adjectives!

Top 5 Weirdest Laws: UK Edition | Reading Comprehension

Across Britain, there are laws still enforced today that date all the way back to the 1300s! Some of them have no relevance in today’s world and are actually quite funny. The Team at Scrambled Eggs English School in Milan have put together a list of the top 5 weirdest laws that still exist in the UK. Get ready for your minds to be blown!

First up, it is actually illegal to be drunk in the pub! Yes, that’s right, you’ve read correctly! According to the 1839 Metropolitan Police Act, it is illegal to be highly intoxicated in a pub or for the pub-keeper to permit drunkenness on the premises

Next up, jumping the queue in the Underground ticket hall is not just rude, but actually illegal! That’s right, us Brits take queueing to a whole new level!

One of the most absurd laws that still exists is that it is apparently illegal to die while in Parliament. As the House of Parliament, less commonly known as the Palace of Westminster, is in fact a royal palace; so, if you were to die there, you would be required to be given a state funeral!

Another interesting law is that you can’t dress up as a soldier or seaman if you go to a fancy-dress party. According to the Seamen’s and Soldier’s False Characters Act 1906, it is illegal to pretend to be part of the armed forces.

Last but certainly not least placing a postage stamp bearing the monarch’s head upside down on an envelope is considered as an act of treason. So, when sending a postcard from your travels in the UK, make sure you place your stamp the right way up!

Which law do you think is the weirdest? What weird Italian laws still exist in Italy today?! Share your opinions by writing a comment below!

If you are curious to find out what the words in bold mean and want to speak like a native, try our comprehension quiz below:

Top 5 Weirdest Laws: UK Edition | Reading Comprehension Quiz

Match the word with its definition.

How did you do?! If you enjoyed this post and want to check out some more of our website, click here to continue practising your English!

I’d Rather | English Grammar Exercise

Today’s online mini-grammar lesson by Scrambled Eggs English School in Milan is on using would rather to express preference.  

Would rather, which can be shortened to ‘d rather, is a more elegant way to say ‘prefer.’ We also use it as a formal way to express desire.

Same Subject
When the subject in the sentence is the same, would rather is followed by a pure infinitive (without ‘to’). We use this structure to talk about our own preferences.
Example: What do you want for dinner tonight? An Indian or Chinese takeaway? I’d rather have an Indian takeaway.

Different Subjects
When there are two different subjects in the sentence, would rather is followed by the past simple (to express preference in the present or future). We use this structure to talk about what we want someone else to do.
Example: Who should give the presentation to the client next week? I’d rather you gave the presentation as you know more about the product.

Are you ready to practice this grammatical structure? Try our quiz below!

I'd rather...

Rewrite the sentences using the structure ‘would rather’ like in the example. Use the contraction I’d in each response.

Example: ‘I should go food shopping today, but I’ll go tomorrow.’ would become ‘I’d rather go food shopping tomorrow.’

How did you do? Click here to try some of our other quizzes. Would you like to learn even more English? Book a lesson at Scrambled Eggs with one of our qualified and experienced native English teachers.