5 Ways to Say Resolve

Are you looking for a way to resolve situations linguistically? We all have language deficiencies that we need to sort out and here at Scrambled Eggs we are ready and equipped to help you clear up any misunderstandings!

The English language can be tricky because sometimes a word has more than one, or even two, meaning(s). The verb resolve is a great example! It is a versatile verb and so we have put together a list of five different ways you can say it!

Do you need to settle a negotiation with an important client?

Or, maybe you need to sort out an important issue with a friend.

Perhaps you need to clear up a misunderstanding in order to move forward with a project.

And then work out a compromise, because who doesn’t want to walk away from a problem with a solid agreement?

Last but not least, maybe you need to fix a problem before moving on with a task.

As you can see, there are five ways you can use the verb resolve. Can you use them all correctly? Can you think of different situations when you could use each one? Now you are ready to linguistically resolve any situation!

5 Ways To Describe Yourself In An Interview

Have an interview soon? As per usual, Scrambled Eggs is here to help! 

Here are five ways to describe yourself to potential employers during an interview:

Business interview English vocabulary

Do you think you’re a creative person? Maybe only a little? This next adjective might be better suited for you:

Business interview English vocabulary

If you’re even a little self-motivated, it’s a great way to describe yourself to impress potential bosses. They’ll definitely love the next description too!

Business interview English vocabulary

You can be sure that Scrambled Eggs’ teachers are always reliable! That’s because we’re always here to help you with any language problems. For example, do you know the next adjective?

Business interview English vocabulary

If you aren’t hard-working, you might have trouble finding a great job! Finally, here’s one more adjective that’s absolutely perfect for any future interviews you have:

Business interview English vocabulary

So, there are our top 5 business interview adjectives. Can you use them all correctly? Do you think they’re appropriate for you? One thing’s certain, if you can drop these words into your personal description during an interview it’s sure to impress the people sitting opposite you!

If you found this blog post useful, check out our other posts on this page, and don’t forget to like us on Facebook and Instagram for more useful content!

5 Different Ways To Say ‘Cold’ In English

Winters in Milan can get really cold, but are you able to describe the different temperature levels in English? Scrambled Eggs has prepared 5 useful adjectives to help you chat about cold weather, so you can practice and improve your English. After all, the weather is the number 1 topic of conversation in Britain!

Crisp winter morning

Crisp weather? Sounds nice! It might not be the most ideal when it comes to weather, but for the most part we look at it with a positive light. What about when it’s a little colder though:

It’s still not too bad when it’s nippy, but things are getting progressively colder when compared to “crisp.” So why don’t we kick it up a notch and make things even colder, with “chilly”:

Hot drink weather

OK, now we start getting serious. And what is even colder than the discomfort of chilly? Probably as cold as it gets here in Milan:

Very cold weather in Milan

And finally, for the coldest days of the year, when you just long for summer, even if here in Milan it gets so hot that it’s torture:

Freezing weather synonyms

And there you go! Now you can chat with any native speaker and compare the weather in Milan with the weather abroad!

Leave a comment below describing the weather today if you want to practise, and check us out on Facebook and Instagram: @scrambledeggsenglish