Easter Egg Hunts

milk chocolate treats

It’s Easter time! For most Italians, that probably means eating a huge amount of food on Sunday, followed by a ‘Pasquetta’ party on Monday, perhaps involving a grill. However, one of the biggest Easter traditions for Americans and Brits is the Easter Egg Hunt! What is it, and why is it so popular, you might ask? Your Scrambled Eggs team is here to provide the answers!

What is an Easter Egg Hunt?

Traditionally, an Easter Egg Hunt is for younger children. Adults are usually responsible for organising the event, and they hide chocolate eggs or painted eggs outside, often in a garden or park. Later in the day, the children are encouraged to search for these gifts that they believe have been left by the Easter Bunny. Sometimes there can be a winner of a competition, such as the child who finds the highest number of eggs, or on other occasions the eggs are shared around all the children. Each Easter Egg Hunt comes with its own rules and traditions.

Why Is It So Popular?

Firstly, these events are great fun for the children as they must search in the flowers, bushes and hidden parts of the garden to find all of the eggs! Most importantly however, it’s a wonderful opportunity to encourage children to run around outside on a holiday that is based around eating a lot (and in particular a lot of sugar!). Parents usually love the Hunt as their children are outside and active, and they can participate with their friends and work together to find the eggs. Finally, and perhaps best of all, the more eggs that you find the more chocolate you can eat!

easter decoration

Did you know that Easter Egg Hunts originally started around the 1700s? Easter is always in Spring, and as the bunny is a symbol of the season people thought that they brought good luck, and should be celebrated. The first Easter Egg hunts didn’t involve chocolate eggs, these were introduced later as traditions evolved.

That’s all from Scrambled Eggs! Did you learn something new? Write in the comments if you enjoyed Easter Egg Hunts when you were a child, and take our quiz to check your understanding of this article!

Easter Egg Hunts: Reading Comprehension Quiz

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The National Monument of Scotland

To help you practice reading in English, we’ve written another article! Read all about one of Edinburgh’s top places, and then try our quiz below to test yourself.

The National Monument of Scotland is one of the most famous attractions in Scotland’s beautiful capital city – Edinburgh. It’s situated on Calton Hill, which is in the city centre, slightly east of the popular Princes Street (the most important shopping street of Edinburgh). Calton Hill can be seen from all over the city, which means that the National Monument is one of the most recognizable sights to see.

It was designed during 1823-6 and based on the world-famous Parthenon in Athens, Greece. However, after construction started in 1829 the project very soon ran out of funds and so it was left unfinished. While there have been many ideas since then about how to finish the work, it has been left in its original state because of the cost and also primarily a lack of local enthusiasm.

The monument is Scotland’s national memorial to the soldiers and sailors who died fighting in the Napoleonic wars. However, because of it’s strange unfinished appearance and iconic status, it’s much more famous nowadays for being a fantastic place to take incredible photos of the picturesque city, enjoy a walk with friends or chill out on a sunny day. For anyone visiting Edinburgh, the monument should be at the top of their to-do list, along with the other attractions on Calton Hill such as the Nelson Monument, the Dugald Stewart Monument and the Robert Burns Monument.

calton hill monument in the edinburgh snow

Have you read it all? Now see if you can remember all the information by taking our quiz:

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5 Different Ways To Say ‘Cold’ In English

Winters in Milan can get really cold, but are you able to describe the different temperature levels in English? Scrambled Eggs has prepared 5 useful adjectives to help you chat about cold weather, so you can practice and improve your English. After all, the weather is the number 1 topic of conversation in Britain!

Crisp winter morning

Crisp weather? Sounds nice! It might not be the most ideal when it comes to weather, but for the most part we look at it with a positive light. What about when it’s a little colder though:

It’s still not too bad when it’s nippy, but things are getting progressively colder when compared to “crisp.” So why don’t we kick it up a notch and make things even colder, with “chilly”:

Hot drink weather

OK, now we start getting serious. And what is even colder than the discomfort of chilly? Probably as cold as it gets here in Milan:

Very cold weather in Milan

And finally, for the coldest days of the year, when you just long for summer, even if here in Milan it gets so hot that it’s torture:

Freezing weather synonyms

And there you go! Now you can chat with any native speaker and compare the weather in Milan with the weather abroad!

Leave a comment below describing the weather today if you want to practise, and check us out on Facebook and Instagram: @scrambledeggsenglish