5 Radio Stations to Help Improve your English!

Are you keen to talk like a native English speaker? To be able to understand colloquial language and expressions used in everyday speech? The team at Scrambled Eggs English school in Milan have the perfect solution for you! We have put together a list of the top 5 radio stations from English speaking countries around the globe to help you to improve your English.

BBC Radio 4

First up, is BBC Radio 4. This UK radio channel has shows that talk about the hottest topics right now, from food to economic fashion, the news and current affairs. They even have shows dedicated to fictional stories. With presenters from across the UK, you’ll hear an array of British accents.

NPR

On the other side of the pond, there is NPR: an American radio station that delivers breaking national and world news. Their stories focus on a range of topics, including business, politics, health, science, technology, music as well as arts and culture. Although the speaking speed is an upper intermediate level, each audio is accompanied with an article for its listeners to read.

Radio Canada

From America’s neighbour to the north we have Radio Canada. Radio Canada is Canada’s official radio station. Here you will find an array of programmes on a variety of different topics: current trends, the great outdoors, arts and culture, technology, science and history. They also air programmes that cover the news and the latest business trends.

ABC Radio Australia

From a country down under we give you ABC Radio Australia. ABC is Australia’s international broadcasting service. Here you can listen to both live and local music as well as talk shows on a number of topics, such as sport, literature, cinema and theatre – you’ll never got bored of listening!

Cape Talk

Last but not least, from beautiful South Africa we present you Cape Talk. Cape Talk is a South African commercial radio station based in Cape Town. It airs shows on the news, sport as well as business. In addition, there are plenty of phone-in debates, so you will have the chance to listen to unscripted English!

Listening to the radio is a great way to practice your English whether you’re at work, cleaning the house or on the go! Comment below and let us know which radio station is your favourite!

5 Adjectives to Describe Significant Moments

Do you ever try to tell a story in a different language and realize that your audience can’t appreciate the significance of the events, because you don’t have the right words to express your feelings? Get ready to learn some new words that we hope can be a huge help to you in the future!

Did something incredible amazing happen to you this summer? Do you have some important memories from your past that you can’t sufficiently describe in English? This is Scrambled Eggs’ list of the best five adjectives to describe very significant and notable moments in your life:

1. Pivotal

pivotal adjective

2. Life-changing

life-changing adjective

3. Jaw-dropping

jaw-dropping adjective

4. Unforgettable

unforgettable adjective

5. Fulfilling

fulfilling adjective

If you are confident that you have understood these words, then you are ready to try our Scrambled Eggs vocabulary test:

Choose the perfect adjective for each sentence:

  1. Finding new jobs or new hobbies can often be completely ____________________.
  2. Improving your fluency in a foreign language might be ____________________ if you’re hoping for a promotion.
  3. Often when you visit a new city you find something ____________________ that leaves you speechless.
  4. One of the most ____________________ moments of my youth was receiving an award at school to recognise all my hard work.
  5. Pretty much everyone had at least one ____________________ holiday with their family when they were young.

Which of our adjectives could you use to describe these situations:

  1. Arriving at a new office for the first time.
  2. Becoming a parent.
  3. Getting fired.
  4. Visiting a new country.
  5. Witnessing a crime.

Post your answers in the comments section below, and let us know what you think about these 5 adjectives!

Top 5 Weirdest Laws: US Edition | Grammar Exercise

Today’s mini-lesson from the Team at Scrambled Eggs English School in Milan is about how to talk about laws.

The USA is a vast and diverse country. Each state in fact has their very own local laws. It’s hardly surprisingly then that over the years strange laws have been passed. We’ve put together a list of the top 5 weirdest laws that still exist in the USA today.

Number 1: In Sant Antonio, Texas, flirting is against the law!

Number 2: If you are found stealing soap in Arizona, you must wash yourself until the bar of soap has been completely used up!

Number 3: If you have a moustache in Eureka, Nevada, you are not allowed to kiss a woman!

Number 4: In Indiana, it is illegal to attend a public event or even use public transport within 4 hours of eating onions or garlic.

Number 5: In Gainesville, Georgia (USA), you are not allowed to eat fried chicken in any way other than by hand.

These laws are definitely quite interesting and funny! But, what language can we used when we talk about the law?

When describing what we can and can’t do, we can use the verbs let and allow. What’s the difference? Well, allow is more formal than let, but aside from that they both have a similar meaning to give permission to.

Importantly, however, they are structured differently:

Check out our exercise below to practice using let and allow:

Top 5 Weirdest Laws: US Edition

Complete the sentences using either let or allow.

How did you do? If you found the exercise difficult, pop by our school. We have a great team of native English teachers that are always happy to help.

Would you like to study more English? Click here to read about the top 5 weirdest laws from the UK!