English Placement Test- Discover your English level by completing the test

Interested in knowing how well-versed you are in English grammar?  Find out your English proficiency level by taking our multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank test.

The test is scored according to a rating system, with difficult questions (those near the completion) awarding more points than those at the start.

Total available points are 121 out of 33 questions. The English proficiency scale is as follows:

A1: 0-12 points. You really have to expand your knowledge because your English is at an elementary level!
A2: 13-37 points. You struggle in actual discussions despite having a fair grasp of the fundamentals, such as the most basic vocabulary and grammar structures.
B1: 38-78 points. You speak at an intermediate level. Although you have a great base, you struggle with challenging words, sentences, and subjects.
B2: 79-102 points. You speak at a less advanced level. You are an expert at the fundamentals and what is important, and you communicate clearly. You occasionally struggle with more complicated debates, but you can usually get by using straightforward language and fundamental concepts.
C1: 103-115 points. You can carry on conversations with native speakers despite having certain lexical gaps and not always understanding how to phrase everything. You generally have excellent grammar.
C2: 116-121 points. You are fluent in colloquial idioms, proverbs, and intricate grammar structures.

The moment has come to take the test!

English Placement Test

Try out the following English language quiz to test your skills and find out your level!

Obviously, compared to your actual level, this is a very low one. At Scrambled Eggs, before beginning a new course, we invite the students to complete an oral exam with one of our teachers to determine their actual English proficiency level.

Check out our English language blog if you’re looking to learn more about the language. You can find a variety of English activities on our website to help you learn and improve your language skills, from simple grammar drills to fascinating Ted Talks given by some of the most well-known public figures in the world!

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees

There are many explanations: isolation among the elderly, rising rents almost anywhere near a coastal city, average life-expectancy increasing, an aging population, decreased birth rate, rising college tuition… While this seems less common in countries like Italy, it is a huge problem in the United States.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

America’s latest housing trend is not about décor or “open concepts.” It’s about the rise of intergenerational—separated by at least one generation—roommates.

There are many explanations: isolation among the elderly, rising rents almost anywhere near a coastal city, average life-expectancy increasing, an aging population, decreased birth rate, rising college tuition… The fact is that older folks have space available, and tend to be happier with a young person around.

In one case, an opera singer and other musicians lived rent-free in a retirement community. How? They agreed to perform concerts for the residents occasionally.

Biologically, this type of living arrangement is kind of humanity’s natural state.

While almost all animals rapidly die off after they become too old to procreate, humans are capable of living decades beyond infertility.

Scholars think this is because our intelligence and life experiences, imparted into the next generation, act as another way to guarantee our genetics are transferred. For example, if you can live long enough to explain to your children and grandchildren which mushrooms they can eat, which snakes are poisonous, etc., those people will have a better chance of survival than a family who lost their parents early on.

Taking an Afternoon Nap May Make Your Brain Healthier

Who doesn’t love a good nap? We wake up feeling recharged and ready to go, or we sleep too long and feel even more tired afterwards. Naps aren’t only good for your brain, your body benefits too. Let’s see what Adam’s got to report about it.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted form this article.

Taking an Afternoon Nap May Make Your Brain Healthier | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Taking an Afternoon Nap May Make Your Brain Healthier | Fill in the Blank

Fill out the text below with the correct answers.

Taking an Afternoon Nap May Make Your Brain Healthier | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

If you love sleeping, then we have good news for you. Afternoon naps might be good for your brain. A study found a correlation between afternoon naps and improved mental agility and cognitive function.

The study involved more than 1,500 elderly subjects. They all claimed to be afternoon nappers—meaning that they like taking naps after lunch. The naps last longer than five minutes but less than two hours. The scientist also measured more than 600 non-nappers of the same age.

There were three major findings. First, elderly individuals who took afternoon naps showed significantly higher cognitive performance. Second, higher levels of TG (triglycerides) were found in napping elderly individuals. Finally, afternoon napping helped with orientation, language function, and memory.

It is important to mention that each subject group reported an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night. This means that daytime nappers were complementing their nighttime sleep instead of compensating for overnight sleep disruptions.

The researchers also noted that not all daytime naps are beneficial. Particularly, naps longer than two hours can actually hurt your cognitive function, so make sure to set an alarm!