Passive voice quiz – The lives of famous women writers

Howdy! Below you’ll find a blog prepared by a native English teacher. Here at Scrambled Eggs we like to prepare videos, news articles and exercises on grammar and vocabulary to help our students continue their learning outside of the classroom. Take a look at this blog about the passive voice, we hope you enjoy it!

In this quiz, you’ll practice the passive voice in all its different forms while learning about the lives of some of the most iconic female writers in the English language.

If you want to review the passive voice before doing the quiz, click here. Otherwise, you can dive right in!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jane Austen

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Virginia Woolf

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Toni Morrison

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Hanya Yanagihara

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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water With Just One Button

Desalination—removing salt from water—will be a necessity in the future. Middle Eastern countries already use this technology to a greater degree than the West and now it’s quickly improving. Within 30 minutes, a new small device can produce one cup of potable water from the sea.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist. It always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water With Just One Button | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water With Just One Button | Fill in the Blank

Fill out the text below with the correct answers.

Turning Seawater Into Drinking Water With Just One Button | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

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Full text:

MIT researchers have developed a portable desalination unit, weighing less than 10 kilograms, that can remove particles and salts to generate drinking water. The device is smaller than a suitcase and requires less power to operate than a cell phone charger. It can also be driven by a small, portable solar panel, which can be purchased online for around $50.

It automatically generates drinking water that exceeds World Health Organization quality standards. The technology is packaged into a user-friendly device that runs with the push of one button. Unlike other portable desalination units that require water to pass through filters, this device utilizes electrical power to remove particles from drinking water. Eliminating the need for replacement filters greatly reduces the long-term maintenance requirements. This could enable the unit to be deployed in remote and severely resource-limited areas or aid refugees fleeing natural disasters.

Other portable desalination units typically require high-pressure pumps to push water through filters, which are very difficult to miniaturize without compromising the energy-efficiency of the device. Instead, this unit relies on a technique called ion concentration polarization (ICP), applying an electrical field to membranes placed above and below a channel of water. The membranes repel positively or negatively charged particles—including salt molecules, bacteria, and viruses—as they flow past. The charged particles are funneled into a second stream of water that is eventually discharged.

The researchers also created a smartphone app that can control the unit wirelessly and report real-time data on power consumption and water salinity. In about half an hour, the device had filled a plastic drinking cup with clear, drinkable water.

Scientists Create Protein that Breaks Down Plastic

Plastic is ubiquitous. Water bottles, bags, food containers. It’s become a massive problem for the planet, for animals, for humans. Now, there might be some hope, a way to break it down before it takes over completely.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist. It always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from a article 

Scientists Create Protein that Breaks Down Plastic | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Scientists Create Protein that Breaks Down Plastic | Fill in the Blank

Fill out the text below with the correct answers.

Scientists Create Protein that Breaks Down Plastic | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

A “Pac-Man” protein that gobbles up plastic and breaks it down could open the door to eliminating billions of tons of landfill waste. The enzyme destroys PET, which, in addition to accounting for 12% of all global waste, is ubiquitous in food and drink packaging as well as textiles.

The protein offers hope for solving global pollution by supercharging large scale recycling. Major industries would be able to recover and reuse products at the molecular level.

The enzyme reduces them into smaller parts—chemicals which can then be reassembled. In some cases, the plastics can be fully broken down in as little as 24 hours.

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, generated novel mutations to a natural enzyme called PETase that allows bacteria to degrade PET.

Experiments proved the effectiveness of the enzyme named “FAST-PETase” (Functional, Active, Stable and Tolerant PETase). Other alternative industrial processes for breaking down plastic are energy-intensive, but biological solutions, like this one, require much less.

Research on enzymes for plastic recycling has advanced during the past 15 years. However, no one had been able to figure out how to make enzymes that could operate efficiently at low temperatures to make them both portable and affordable at large industrial scale—until now.