Learn English with the News – Vintage Video Games Could Be Worth Millions

Video games: fun free-time activity or potential business affair? It seems like collecting vintage video games has become both a serious collection activity as well as a great way to earn money if you have the likes of old Zelda or Super Mario video games. Who knew that these old, pixelated video games could be worth so much?!

Watch the video and then do the accompanying exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Vintage Video Games Could Be Worth Millions | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Vintage Video Games Could Be Worth Millions | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Vintage Video Games Could Be Worth Millions | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

FULL TEXT:

“Collecting retro video games is more than a hobby for some people. In the beginning, many people considered it a fad that would quickly pass, believing it to be a simple case of nostalgia. Others would scour auction sites or connect with niche groups of hobbyists in order to build their collections.
However, in early August of 2021, an unopened vintage copy of “Super Mario Bros” from 1985, set a new world record by selling for $2 million. A sealed copy of “Super Mario 64” sold a few weeks earlier for $1.5 million, and 2 days before that “The Legend of Zelda,” from 1987, sold for $870,000.
Many factors are involved in determining the price of these modern relics: the condition of the box, cartridge, and manual, as well as whether or not it is unopened. These once mass produced items have morphed into unique items over time, like sneakers or trading cards (“Pokémon” for example).
People are more likely to invest in characters such as Mario, Cloud Strife from “Final Fantasy VII” or “Zelda” protagonist Link who appeal to their sense of nostalgia for their childhood; the continuing popularity of these video game franchises attests to the high costs.
The video game industry is moving toward digital-only sales which may lead to physical games becoming extinct. Developers, with the next generation of nostalgic investors in mind, are creating digital collectors’ editions. They believe that, in the future, kids will want to continue to recreate the video game collections or buy what they were not able to acquire as a kid.”

Learn English with the News – Madrid Building Urban Forest To Fight Climate Change

Climate change is devastating cities and countries all over the world. What is Spain’s capital, Madrid doing about it? A green wall! With this immersion of nature in a concrete metropolis, Madrid hopes to boost oxygen and fight pollution in a positive way.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

 

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Madrid Building Urban Forest To Fight Climate Change | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Madrid Building Urban Forest To Fight Climate Change | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words

Madrid Building Urban Forest To Fight Climate Change | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

Full Text:

“Madrid is currently building a green wall around the city in order to help fight against climate change and pollution. The wall is set to cover roughly 75-kilometres and include half a million new trees.
Madrid’s councillor for environment and urban development, with this project, is attempting to improve the air quality of the entire city. He wants to fight the “heat island” effect that is happening inside the city which occurs when structures within a city absorb and re-emit the sun’s heat.
Desertification is slowly approaching southern Europe. The urban forest in Madrid intends to be both a mitigation and adaptation measure in the face of climate change.
This project will utilize derelict areas that are in-between roads and buildings and is estimated to absorb 175,000 tons of carbon dioxide each year. It will make use of indigenous trees which absorb CO2 and heat generated by human activity. In the shade of these trees, temperatures are 2 degrees lower.
Part of Madrid’s goal is reducing car use, increasing pedestrianisation and promoting a new green culture, all of which will be necessary for a sustainable future.
Around the world, cities consume approximately two-thirds of the global energy supply while generating about three-quarters of its greenhouse emissions.
Restricting traffic, promoting cycling and public transport, and planting trees are simple ways to reduce the energy consumption that contributes to the heat island effect. Cities will be the most affected by climate change, but they are also an essential part of the solution.”

 

Learn English with the News – New Lego Bricks to Be Made of Recycled Plastic

Lego blocks and the environment? Who ever thought those two topics would ever meet? Well, Lego has decided to introduce recycled plastic into their supply chain, doing their small yet significant part in helping the environment. Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Lego Bricks | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Lego Bricks | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Lego Bricks | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

Full text:

“Lego’s iconic toy bricks will soon become more sustainable. The legendary toymaker unveiled a new prototype brick that is made entirely of recycled plastic, though it is not yet available in stores.
This latest design is the first made from recycled material that has passed Lego’s strict quality, safety and play requirements. The previous several iterations were not durable enough to meet their standards. The company believes that it is finally on the way to making its products in a sustainable way.
The new prototype is made using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) which is taken from recycled bottles. Reportedly, Lego’s scientists and engineers tested over 250 variations of PET materials in addition to hundreds of other plastic formulations, before nailing down the aforementioned prototype.
A  one-liter plastic PET bottle yields, on average, enough material to make ten 2 x 4 Lego bricks.
Tim Brooks, Lego’s VP of environmental responsibility said that the company is “super excited about this breakthrough.” He added, “The biggest challenge on our sustainability journey is rethinking and innovating new materials that are as durable, strong and high quality as our existing bricks — and fit with LEGO elements made over the past 60 years. With this prototype, we’re able to showcase the progress we’re making.”
That being said, don’t rush to the toy store just yet. The next phase of testing is expected to take at least a year.”