Learn English with the News – More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers

Uproar in the museum and arts industry makes its way to London! Check out the latest in what’s happening all over the news with Scrambled Eggs’ “Learn English with the News.” Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers | Definition Match

Match the words to the correct definitions.

More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers | Fill In The Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers | True or False

Decide if the statement is true or false

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

“An open letter signed by more than 300 artists, including several former Turner prize winners, in
support of striking Tate workers has demanded the organisation uses 10% of the £7m it received
from the government to stop redundancies. The Tate is one of the most visited art galleries in
London.
Last year’s four Turner prize winners are among the signatories, who support the letter which says
multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multilingual, workers from low-income backgrounds will be cut out of
the arts sector without action.
The workers, who are on strike over the 313 job cuts across Tate Enterprises (TEL), say the money
awarded to the organisation as part of the government’s £1.57bn arts support package is not
being used to save jobs and the most precarious workers across the culture sector will be
expected to pay for the Covid-19 crisis.
They urge TEL to stop the redundancy process immediately and to start exploring new imaginative
ways to save jobs and avoid outsourcing. Tate has previously given TEL £5m from its reserves
which Tate said has prevented the TEL business from closing with the loss of all jobs, but the
workers are calling for funds to be used to save existing roles.
In response Tate said the decision to restructure TEL was a last resort and that it is offering
preferential treatment to those made redundant for any vacancies at Tate. It added that with
drastically reduced visitor numbers, there is simply not enough work to employ the same number
of people in our shops and catering outlets as before.
A spokesperson for Tate said that theTate is facing a £50m shortfall in self-generated income this
year and that they are doing all they can to mitigate the impact of that. They are halving all
budgets, freezing all but essential recruitment, a voluntary 10% pay cut has been taken by the
executive group, and they continue to argue for more government support.”

Learn English with the News – Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache

The fight for or against vaccines has been raging in the UK, and scientists are worried that skepticism could affect the results of specific trials. Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | Fill In The Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text

“It will soon be critical for the NHS to start vaccinating people against flu, to prevent hospitals
being swamped with flu and Covid-19 patients this winter. Large-scale trials of Covid-19
vaccines, already under way in some places, are likely to start in Bradford in the autumn. It's
therefore worrying, says Dr John Wright of the city's Royal Infirmary, that anti-vax conspiracy
theories seem to have flourished in this pandemic.
The numbers of hospital patients continue to slowly decline in the UK, almost down to single
figures this week. There is great relief in Bradford hospital, tempered by the inevitability of a
further spike of infection. You may know of the warning from Game of Thrones – winter is
coming – and never before has that phrase been so ominous. The prediction of a second wave
of Covid-19 in January, with the added layer of an influenza epidemic, is John Wright’s worst
fear. He and his team will be working hard to make sure they vaccinate as many people for flu
as they can in the autumn.
The race for an effective Covid-19 vaccine continues at pace. Over 130 candidate vaccines have
now been developed and more than 30 are in clinical trials, with some showing promising early
signs.
The Bradford Institute of Health Research is one of just five national centres for patient
recruitment to clinical trials, and the staff have lots of expertise with testing new drugs.
However, vaccine trials are a completely different ball game. Rather than trialling new drugs on
a small number of patients with specific diseases they will be testing new vaccines on hundreds
and thousands of healthy volunteers. They have been exploring how they could use sports
centres or community halls to recruit these volunteers, and how they can scale up their
research teams to cope with the numbers.
They had been preparing for two different vaccine trials, only for the companies to pull them
from the UK at the last minute and move them to the Americas. The pandemic fires have been
dampened in Europe, but in the US and Latin America they continue to rage, and if you are
going to test a new vaccine you need countries where the virus is still accelerating.
But despite these two false starts, there will be further trials of other candidate vaccines.
It’s therefore important to win the support of the public so that they sign up to these new trials,
and to do that there is a need to counter some of the growing false news stories that the public
are hearing on community grapevines, which are leading people to believe that the vaccines are
harmful.”

London Day Trips | Reading Comprehension

Summer is here! If you’re visiting London for a long weekend this summer, here are some quaint nearby towns that you can visit in a day. Not only is a daytrip a great way to beat the hustle and bustle of the city, you will also get the opportunity to see a different side to British life.

With this in mind, we at Scrambled Eggs Scuola di Inglese, Milano have put together a list of 5 towns close to London that you can reach by train in less than an hour and a half. Read on to find out how to enjoy some fresh air and escape the city traffic.

 

First up, we have Brighton.

Extremely popular among Brits, Brighton is the place to be. When you arrive, head straight to Brighton’s pebbled beach and have some traditional fish chips – just watch out for those seagulls. Then, relive your childhood days by visiting the funfair and arcade, which are both situated on Brighton’s famous pier. Those who love to shop need to visit The Lanes Brighton where you will find numerous independent shops and boutiques. Brighton is also the LGBTQ capital of the UK and has many amazing live music venues!

By train: 1 hour 16 minutes from St. Pancras International

 

Next up, Windsor.

Crazy about the Royal family? Everyone visits Buckingham Palace and the Tower of London, but there’s also Windsor Castle! A royal residence built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion of England, it has been the home of British kings and queens for almost 1,000 years. While you’re there, check out Windsor’s great park which spans 4,800 acres. After a morning of sightseeing, a great place to spend your afternoon is at Windsor and Eton brewery. Here you can learn how beer is made and try some local beers.

By train: 52 minutes from Vauxhall

 

Another great option is Whitstable.

A picture-perfect, seaside town, Whitstable is definitely worth a visit, especially if you love cycling! With a sea front stretching 5 miles, Whitstable is the perfect place to rent a bike and go on a tranquil bike ride along the coast. For lunch, you must have oysters. Whitstable is famous for its native oysters, which have been collected since Roman times, and are available all year round. Spend your evening relaxing on the beach and enjoying the beautiful sun set.

By train: 1 hour 14 minutes from St. Pancras International

 

Next on the list is Rye.

Once an important fishing town, Rye is now home to art museums, antique shops and cosy pubs. Rye is a city rich in history and is best explored by going on a walking tour down its higgledy-piggledy cobbled streets. Key places to visit are Rye Castle, the Citadel and St. Mary’s church. A short bus journey away is Camber Sands, East Sussex’s only sand dune. Here you can stroll along the beach’s golden sands or try out some water sports.

By train: 1 hour 9 minutes from St. Pancras International with a change at Ashford

 

Last on the list is St. Albans.

Named after the first British saint, Alban, St. Albans is a city steeped in history. Its Medieval roots are evident today, and there are even some remains from the Roman era. History aside, St. Albans is known for its pubs! Claiming to have the greatest number of pubs per square mile, and the oldest pub in England, ‘Ye Olde Fighting Cocks,’ it’s a great place to go on a bar crawl. St. Albans is also popular for its markets, where you can buy local homemade produce and products!

By train: 20 minutes from St. Pancras International

 

Quiz: London Day Trips

Now that you have finished reading the article, test your knowledge of the words in bold by trying this definitions quiz!

 

There are many more towns just outside London that are worth visiting. Let us know in the comments below which of the places listed you would like to visit the most.

Safe travels!