Learn English with the News – More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers

Uproar in the museum and arts industry makes its way to London! Check out the latest in what’s happening all over the news with Scrambled Eggs’ “Learn English with the News.” Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers | Definition Match

Match the words to the correct definitions.

More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers | Fill In The Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

More than 300 artists sign letter in support of striking London gallery workers | True or False

Decide if the statement is true or false

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

“An open letter signed by more than 300 artists, including several former Turner prize winners, in
support of striking Tate workers has demanded the organisation uses 10% of the £7m it received
from the government to stop redundancies. The Tate is one of the most visited art galleries in
London.
Last year’s four Turner prize winners are among the signatories, who support the letter which says
multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multilingual, workers from low-income backgrounds will be cut out of
the arts sector without action.
The workers, who are on strike over the 313 job cuts across Tate Enterprises (TEL), say the money
awarded to the organisation as part of the government’s £1.57bn arts support package is not
being used to save jobs and the most precarious workers across the culture sector will be
expected to pay for the Covid-19 crisis.
They urge TEL to stop the redundancy process immediately and to start exploring new imaginative
ways to save jobs and avoid outsourcing. Tate has previously given TEL £5m from its reserves
which Tate said has prevented the TEL business from closing with the loss of all jobs, but the
workers are calling for funds to be used to save existing roles.
In response Tate said the decision to restructure TEL was a last resort and that it is offering
preferential treatment to those made redundant for any vacancies at Tate. It added that with
drastically reduced visitor numbers, there is simply not enough work to employ the same number
of people in our shops and catering outlets as before.
A spokesperson for Tate said that theTate is facing a £50m shortfall in self-generated income this
year and that they are doing all they can to mitigate the impact of that. They are halving all
budgets, freezing all but essential recruitment, a voluntary 10% pay cut has been taken by the
executive group, and they continue to argue for more government support.”

Learn English with the News – Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache

The fight for or against vaccines has been raging in the UK, and scientists are worried that skepticism could affect the results of specific trials. Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | Fill In The Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text

“It will soon be critical for the NHS to start vaccinating people against flu, to prevent hospitals
being swamped with flu and Covid-19 patients this winter. Large-scale trials of Covid-19
vaccines, already under way in some places, are likely to start in Bradford in the autumn. It's
therefore worrying, says Dr John Wright of the city's Royal Infirmary, that anti-vax conspiracy
theories seem to have flourished in this pandemic.
The numbers of hospital patients continue to slowly decline in the UK, almost down to single
figures this week. There is great relief in Bradford hospital, tempered by the inevitability of a
further spike of infection. You may know of the warning from Game of Thrones – winter is
coming – and never before has that phrase been so ominous. The prediction of a second wave
of Covid-19 in January, with the added layer of an influenza epidemic, is John Wright’s worst
fear. He and his team will be working hard to make sure they vaccinate as many people for flu
as they can in the autumn.
The race for an effective Covid-19 vaccine continues at pace. Over 130 candidate vaccines have
now been developed and more than 30 are in clinical trials, with some showing promising early
signs.
The Bradford Institute of Health Research is one of just five national centres for patient
recruitment to clinical trials, and the staff have lots of expertise with testing new drugs.
However, vaccine trials are a completely different ball game. Rather than trialling new drugs on
a small number of patients with specific diseases they will be testing new vaccines on hundreds
and thousands of healthy volunteers. They have been exploring how they could use sports
centres or community halls to recruit these volunteers, and how they can scale up their
research teams to cope with the numbers.
They had been preparing for two different vaccine trials, only for the companies to pull them
from the UK at the last minute and move them to the Americas. The pandemic fires have been
dampened in Europe, but in the US and Latin America they continue to rage, and if you are
going to test a new vaccine you need countries where the virus is still accelerating.
But despite these two false starts, there will be further trials of other candidate vaccines.
It’s therefore important to win the support of the public so that they sign up to these new trials,
and to do that there is a need to counter some of the growing false news stories that the public
are hearing on community grapevines, which are leading people to believe that the vaccines are
harmful.”

Lezioni Online: Il Covid-19 sta cambiando in meglio l’educazione scolastica

[English here]

Le scuole sono spesso restie al cambio di rotta, ma la necessità portata da questa pandemia è stata la causa primaria del reinventarsi online. Scrambled Eggs scuola d’inglese a Milano – insieme con i suoi insegnanti inglesi madrelingua – ha combattuto con questa emergenza sanitaria sin dal principio e ne è uscita più entusiasta e forte che mai.

Questa pandemia potrebbe quindi cambiare profondamente il mondo delle scuole e dell’educazione, e potrebbe farlo in meglio!

Se ci guardiamo indietro attraverso la storia, il settore è sempre stato uno dei più conservativi e resistenti al cambiamento in un mondo invece di rinnovamento costante. Per secoli ha avuto l’ardesia su cui scrivere; poi è arrivato il secolo della lavagna e del gessetto. Oggi invece agli studenti basta solo un click con le proprie dita per immergersi nella vasta conoscenza che può offrire google – molto più immensa di quella di qualsiasi altro insegnante individuale presente sul pianeta.

Il Coronavirus ha dato alla scuola piattaforme come Zoom, Microsoft Teams e Google Classroom. Con la tecnologia siamo riusciti a convertire un normale schermo di un computer in una lezione, con una classe di studenti ed insegnanti capaci di potersi vedere e interagire l’un l’altro, in una vera collaborazione orientata all’apprendimento online.
Appena dopo l’inizio del lockdown nel Regno Unito, il Ministero per l’Educazione ha promosso una nuova scuola online, la Oak National Academy, dove gli studenti hanno effettuato l’accesso a 2 milioni di differenti tipologie di lezioni per tutto il paese, e questo solo nella prima settimana. La necessità si può dire sia veramente la madre dell’ingegno.

La pandemia ci ha condotto a rivalutare la maniera in cui noi vediamo l’educazione, e ci ha fatto notare che dobbiamo attivarci in questo velocemente. Il governo del Regno Unito, ad esempio, vede adesso il vantaggio dell’insegnamento online perché questo ha reso disponibili i vari laptop o tablet anche per studenti provenienti da famiglie che normalmente non potrebbero permettersi certi strumenti tecnologici, ora necessari per lo sviluppo della didattica.

I nostri studenti, qui a Scrambled Eggs, sono stati più che entusiasti di partecipare a delle lezioni virtuali; e abbiamo ottenuto dei feedback incredibilmente positivi! Le lezioni di inglese online, ad esempio, eliminano i lunghi tragitti verso la nostra scuola a Milano, situata in zona Navigli. Permettono oltretutto ai nostri insegnanti di raggiungere molti più studenti di prima, siccome ora abbiamo anche parecchi studenti che risiedono attualmente addirittura in altre regioni d’Italia, così come in altri paesi in giro per il mondo.
In futuro, le lezioni online possono permettere agli studenti di fare lezione quando ne hanno il tempo – cambiando anche gli orari di volta in volta – e permettono loro inoltre di stare a casa o nella location che preferiscono.

Che cosa possiamo imparare da questo?

Primo. Le crisi ci spingono ad adattarci. Nella situazione attuale, il COVID ha obbligato i genitori a diventare insegnanti e ha imposto a tutti – studenti, insegnanti e genitori stessi – di adattarsi ai nuovi strumenti di apprendimento online.

Secondo: le persone si sono trovate a proprio agio con alcuni di questi adeguamenti. In un momento in cui le famiglie sono spesso stressate tentando di fornire una buona educazione morale e scolastica ai propri figli, stanno sperimentando anche metodi educativi e mezzi che non avevano mai visto prima. Si stanno abituando ad essi, il che significa che stanno anche vedendo i benefici che queste nuove derive tecnologiche possono apportare.

Tutto ciò non è per dire che tutti gli strumenti online sono buoni. Al contrario, molti non lo sono.
Ma considera questo: supponiamo che un’insegnante sperimenti tre strumenti online durante questa crisi. Le piace lo strumento A, non le piace invece lo strumento B, ed è indifferente rispetto allo strumento o alla piattaforma C. Questa dinamica non sembra però alla base di grosse trasformazioni sociali, vero?
Be’, in realtà, se la crisi dovuta alla pandemia non fosse mai avvenuta, la stessa insegnante non sarebbe mai venuta a conoscenza di nessuno di questi mezzi o piattaforme online. E non importa, in questo caso, che la piattaforma B o C non abbia avuto successo; quello che importa è che le persone siano rimaste soddisfatte della piattaforma A, e che vogliano continuare ad utilizzarla:
questo – in definitiva – può essere trasformativo.

Qui a Scrambled Eggs – Scuola di Inglese a Milano – abbiamo di certo provato a sperimentare nuove vie per continuare a svolgere il nostro mestiere al meglio delle nostre possibilità, tentando anche di rinnovarci e migliorare man mano. E sentendo quello che dicono i nostri studenti, possiamo dire di aver estratto il meglio dagli aspetti negativi che questa pandemia ha portato, riuscendo via via a limare e poi a togliere definitivamente tutte le imperfezioni che un nuovo modo di insegnare può creare. Adesso possiamo dire con certezza, e con un pizzico di orgoglio, che dopo questa crisi mondiale ne siamo usciti come migliori insegnanti, forse anche come persone migliori, in grado di tirare fuori il meglio dai nostri studenti, anche se essi si trovano lontano.

È impossibile dire con certezza dove esattamente il COVID-19 ci ha costretto ad andare e verso quali novità finiremo, ma qui a Scrambled English School Milan siamo sempre pronti ad adattarci e a dare ai nostri studenti il prodotto migliore possibile, sia che dobbiamo farlo di persona che tramite un computer.

Se ti interessa la possibilità di frequentare un corso online, clicca su questa pagina, oppure mandaci una mail a: hello@scrambledeggsinglese.it

Scrambled Eggs Milano è con te, e ti aiuta a imparare l’inglese!