Every, Each, All

Take this quiz to test your knowledge of when to use every, each, or all!
First test your knowledge –

Every, Each, All

Complete the sentences with the correct word.

How did you do? If you didn’t do very well, read the below explanation and let’s see if it becomes clearer!

Now, let’s try this again!

Every, Each, All II

Fill in the blank with the correct word

 

Learn English with the News – Fossil Fuel Firms Sue Governments Claiming Climate Policies Hurt Profits

Oil companies blame individuals for climate change. Individuals blame the oil companies. But, we’re all in this together and finding a solution means working together without passing the blame around. Are companies ready to do something, or is just more talk?

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Fossil Fuel Firms Sue Governments Claiming Climate Policies Hurt Profits || Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Fossil Fuel Firms Sue Governments Claiming Climate Policies Hurt Profits || Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Fossil Fuel Firms Sue Governments Claiming Climate Policies Hurt Profits || True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

“Fossil fuel companies are suing governments across the world. They claim that action against climate change is threatening their profits.

How can they do this? The companies are exploiting a legal process that allows them to sue governments under international laws which control trade agreements and treaties. Because the treaties are international, the courts that govern the laws are also international. This means that a country, like Italy, can be fined for fighting against climate change by advocating alternative energy.

One company, Rockhopper, is suing the Italian government for $325m. Italy’s ban on offshore oil drilling close to the coastline, the company says, is hurting their profits.

These companies, which are major contributors to the climate crisis, are not trying to fix the problem. Instead they are looking for more money directly from governments.

The countries involved are convinced that an international tribunal will form an objective opinion.”

Too, Very and So – English Grammar Exercise

Too, very, and so are all similar words, but they are used in different ways. Let’s take a look at the differences!

 

Too is used with an adjective to talk about something that is problematic or excessive. It means “more than it should be”.  It always has a negative meaning, and is used with negative adjectives like “expensive” or “tired”.

Examples:

Those shoes are too expensive! (The shoes are MORE expensive than they should be)

I am too tired to go to the party tonight. (I am MORE tired than I should be)

 

Too can also be used with much / many.

            Examples:

            I ate too much food!

            There were too many people at the beach.

 

 

Very is also used to make an adjective stronger, but it doesn’t have a negative meaning.

            Examples:

            It was very hot yesterday.

            The exam was very difficult.

 

Very can also be used with nouns, unlike too and so.

            Examples:

            Tomorrow will be a very cold day.

            Maria is a very beautiful girl.

 

 

So is similar to too, and can be used with positive or negative adjectives. So is often used with “that”. Ex: The party was so fun that I stayed for hours.

            Examples:

            The park is so far from my house.

            I am so happy that you came!

            The cake was so good that I ate two pieces.

 

Too, Very and So - English Grammar Exercise

Try this quiz with very, too, and so!