A Brit in Italy: 5 Things we do in the UK that would be considered a sin in Italy

Italian and British culture are not exactly the same; let’s discover some of the most common differences with Beth !!!

  1. Cocktails with meals

Cocktail culture in the UK & USA is pretty famous all over the world, but we take it to an extent that every Italian would gasp in horror at. We drink pina coladas with steak, long island iced teas with carbonara, strawberry mojitos with hot-dogs… any combination you can think of, we probably do it! Coming to Italy, I’ve learnt that there are certain drinking rules, e.g., white wine with fish, beer with pizza, red wine with red meat. These were all new to me, but I promise I now abide by your ‘laws’!

 

  1. Going out with wet hair

The infamous colpo d’aria is spoken about every day around the country, but many don’t know that it’s just an old wives’ tale! Of course, if you are already sick and you expose yourself to the cold, it could make it worse. But there’s no evidence that suggests going outside with wet hair can produce a virus or bacteria… which is why in the UK, you’ll see many people outside with wet hair. Plus, it rains so often that you’re bound to end up soaking wet anyway!

 

  1. Walking barefoot everywhere

Although the UK is famous for its terrible weather, the country just doesn’t seem to be as dusty as Italy. It is extremely common for us to walk around the house with no shoes or socks on, especially as most of our rooms have carpets. Additionally, those who live in the countryside or who have gardens can walk around barefoot even outside! As a child I spent most of my time with no shoes on, but of course you shouldn’t expect to see people barefoot in public. I think we can all agree that those who take their shoes off on airplanes are the worst!

 

  1. Drinking coffee at all hours (including with dinner)

This one is no longer a shock to most Italians, but yes… we drink cappuccinos, lattes, macchiatos, every coffee you can think of at all times of the day! Irish coffees (hot coffee with cream and whisky) are very popular after dinner, and it’s normal for us to have coffee with meals. This of course includes the full English breakfast, but I think you can let us off the hook for that one!

 

  1. Not saying hello/goodbye to everyone

When entering or leaving a party in the UK, we usually just say a sweeping hello/goodbye to the room, or to anyone who needs to know where we are. In Italy, however, I’ve learnt that it’s rude to leave someone out when greetings are involved. Hugs and kisses must be given to everyone! If you visit the UK, feel free to pull an Irish exit… we promise we won’t mind!

 

A Brit in Italy || Vocabulary

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Learn English with the News – UEFA Opens Disciplinary Proceedings against Three European Giants

Football mania! The world’s most popular sport has seen a bit of a plot twist when some of the most important teams decided to have a go at making their own private league, effectively cutting out the global organizers. What happened next is for the history books! Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website!

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

UEFA Opens Disciplinary Proceedings against Three European Giants | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

UEFA Opens Disciplinary Proceedings against Three European Giants | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

UEFA Opens Disciplinary Proceedings against Three European Giants | True or False

Decide if the statement is true or false.

 

Full Text:

UEFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against three European giants: Real Madrid, Barcelona and Juventus. The teams were part of a larger group of 12 that announced they wanted to start a new competition.

Their idea received heavy criticism. The other nine clubs spread out across the UK, Italy and Spain changed their minds. They expressed regret for their actions and recommitted to the UEFA club.

Real Madrid, Barcelona and Juventus then issued a joint statement. They said that they intended to persevere in finding a solution, calling the current football situation “unsustainable.”

UEFA released a statement that they will investigate “a potential violation of UEFA’s legal framework.”

The nine clubs were ordered to collectively donate 15 million euros to charities. In addition, they will not receive five percent of the revenues from competitions as scheduled.

UEFA says the clubs have agreed to be fined up to 100 million euros should they breach their commitments again.

For now, the form of punishment that may await Real Madrid, Barcelona and Juventus after the disciplinary proceedings is unclear.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

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Four Ways to Describe a Photograph

We see hundreds of photographs every day. Whether it’s on social media or in advertisements; photos are a huge part of our lives. They allow us to document special moments, educate about current events and communicate emotions. Photos have started revolutions and helped to overthrow dictators. They also allow us to relive our favorite memories and see people who may no longer be with us. It is useful to be able to describe the technical aspects of a photograph.

 

Foreground v Background

When you want to describe something in a photograph, you may need to indicate if it is in the foreground or the background. The foreground the part of the image that is closer to you, and the background is the the part that is far away.

“In the foreground there are four men walking.”

“In the background there is a long street with cars parked on the sides of the road.”

The Beatles’ Road Into History on Abbey Road, Iain Macmillan

Color or Greyscale/Black&White

Most photos are taken either in Color or in Greyscale (also known as “black and white”). In the past, it was only possible to make photos in greyscale. Today, whether a photo is in color or greyscale is an artistic choice.

“This photo of the Hindenburg disaster is in greyscale.”

“Today most photos are taken in color.”

The Hindenburg Disaster, Sam Shere 1937

Landscape (horizontal) or Portrait (vertical)

The terms “portrait” and “landscape” can describe the subject of a photo: “portrait” meaning that it is a photo of a person and “landscape” meaning it is a photo of a natural scene. However, these terms can also be used to describe the orientation of a photo. A photo take horizontally is in “landscape orientation” and a photo taken vertically is in “portrait orientation”.

“This photo is in portrait orientation.”

“If you take a photo of a mountain, it will probably be in landscape orientation.”

Dorothea Lange | Migrant Mother | 1936

Natural or Artificial Lighting

Lighting is the most important factor in photography! “Photography” literally means “the study of light”. So the type of light the photographer uses is very important and can change the mood and quality of the photo. A photographer may use “natural light,” meaning light from the sun, or “The photographer used artificial lighting.”

“Landscape photos are almost always made with natural light.”

 

Moon and Half Dome, Yosemite, California. Ansel Adams. 1960