English Exercise – Passive Voice

The passive voice is used very frequently in English, as it is used when the subject is unknown or doesn’t need to be mentioned. In fact, that last sentence was in the passive voice!

To form the passive voice, we put the verb to be into the tense needed, then we add the past participle.

 

For example:

Active voiceI made dinner tonight

Passive voiceDinner was made tonight

 

Active voiceI write an essay every week

Passive voiceEvery week, an essay is written

 

Active voiceHe will commit a crime

Passive voiceA crime will be committed

 

We also use the passive voice if we want to give the focus of the sentence to another subject. For example, if we say: The album was recorded by Oasis in 1999. This means that we are more interested in the album than the band.

Something which helps with IELTS Writing Task 1 could be the fact that we use the passive voice when describing a process.

E.g. The flour is poured into a bowl, then the sugar is added and mixed together.

 

Passive Voice

Make these sentences passive voice:

 

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Present Continuous Future

Most of the time, we use the present continuous to talk about actions that are happening at the time of speaking. However, it is also extremely common to use it to talk about the future. Not everything in the future, though!

We use the present continuous to explain things that are pre-planned.

Because we also use this tense to speak in the present, it is necessary to add a time reference when speaking in the future.

For example:

I’m taking the train (right now)
I’m taking the train next week (in the future)

We can also use them in the same sentence to refer to different times!

For example:

Kelly is attending a course right now and later she’s going to the cinema, so she won’t be free all day.

As you may know, we can also use ‘going to + infinitive’ instead of the present continuous to speak in the future tense.

For example:

Next week I’m visiting my parents
Next week I’m going to visit my parents

They mean the same thing!

The structure of the present continuous is relatively simple; we take the verb ‘to be’ (am/are/is) + verb + -ing.

To form the negative, we just add the word ‘not’ before the verb.

For example:

I’m going to the restaurant tonight/I’m not going to the restaurant tonight

As always in English, the question form is a little bit trickier. The verb ‘to be’ goes at the start of the sentence…

For example:

Are you joining us at the gym tonight?
Is she coming to the party on Saturday?

As mentioned, the present continuous future is only used for planned events, or something you’re about to start doing (I’m going to bed, I’m going for a shower), so it would be impossible to use it with things you can’t predict.

For example:

It’s raining next month
My arm is hurting tomorrow

Unless you can control the weather or you plan on walking into a wall, of course!

So now you’ve learnt about the present continuous future, why not take our quiz and see how much you remember..?

Present Continuous Future Exercise

Complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb in brackets.

3rd Conditional – English Grammar Exercise

The third conditional is used when describing something that never happened, and then imagining the outcome of that situation.

The structure is: if + past perfect, would have + past participle

For example: “If she had studied, she would have passed the exam” (but she didn’t study, and therefore didn’t pass the exam).

The first action (If she had studied) did not happen. But if it had happened, the consequence would be that she would have passed the exam.

The 3rd conditional is relatively similar to the 2nd. However, the 2nd conditional describes something unrealistic or impossible in the present or future, the 3rd conditional refers to something that didn’t happen in the past.

For example:

“She wouldn’t have been tired if she had gone to bed earlier” (but she went to bed late, so she’s tired).

“If you hadn’t been late, we wouldn’t have missed the flight” (but you were late, so we missed the flight).

So now you’ve seen a few examples, why not test your knowledge with our quiz!

3rd Conditional exercise

Rewrite the sentences using the 3rd conditional

What do you think about the 3rd conditional? Do you find it easy or hard? Let us know what you think in the comments, and make sure to check out our other blog posts and English exercises!