Present Continuous Future

Most of the time, we use the present continuous to talk about actions that are happening at the time of speaking. However, it is also extremely common to use it to talk about the future. Not everything in the future, though!

We use the present continuous to explain things that are pre-planned.

Because we also use this tense to speak in the present, it is necessary to add a time reference when speaking in the future.

For example:

I’m taking the train (right now)
I’m taking the train next week (in the future)

We can also use them in the same sentence to refer to different times!

For example:

Kelly is attending a course right now and later she’s going to the cinema, so she won’t be free all day.

As you may know, we can also use ‘going to + infinitive’ instead of the present continuous to speak in the future tense.

For example:

Next week I’m visiting my parents
Next week I’m going to visit my parents

They mean the same thing!

The structure of the present continuous is relatively simple; we take the verb ‘to be’ (am/are/is) + verb + -ing.

To form the negative, we just add the word ‘not’ before the verb.

For example:

I’m going to the restaurant tonight/I’m not going to the restaurant tonight

As always in English, the question form is a little bit trickier. The verb ‘to be’ goes at the start of the sentence…

For example:

Are you joining us at the gym tonight?
Is she coming to the party on Saturday?

As mentioned, the present continuous future is only used for planned events, or something you’re about to start doing (I’m going to bed, I’m going for a shower), so it would be impossible to use it with things you can’t predict.

For example:

It’s raining next month
My arm is hurting tomorrow

Unless you can control the weather or you plan on walking into a wall, of course!

So now you’ve learnt about the present continuous future, why not take our quiz and see how much you remember..?

Present Continuous Future Exercise

Complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb in brackets.

Must vs Have To – English Language Exercise

Both must and have to can be used in relation to obligation, but what are the differences?

Must is used with internal obligations. This usually involves rules and laws, or something you feel is necessary.

E.g. You must drive on the left side of the road in the UK.

I must study harder if I want to pass that exam.

It can also be used with certainty.

E.g. If you study English every day, you must be dedicated!

You must be tired after driving all night!

Have to, on the other hand, is used for every other type of obligation. It is definitely the most commonly used, as it can even substitute must in some circumstances!

E.g. I have to speak in English for my presentation tomorrow, I’m scared!.

She always has to wake up early for work.

HOWEVER! In their negative forms (mustn’t and don’t have to), they have completely different meanings!

Mustn’t expresses prohibition.

E.g. You mustn’t eat this cake (you are prohibited to eat the cake).

Don’t have to expresses the absence of obligation:

E.g. You don’t have to eat this cake (you are not obliged to eat the cake, but you can if you want to).

So now you know the rules, why not try our quiz and test your knowledge?

Must vs Have To Exercise

Fill in the gaps with the correct expression of obligation.

So, how did you do? We’re sure you did a great job, but if you’d like some more practise then try our listening exercise here, and take a look at our other blog posts for some more English exercises!

Learn English with the News – Two Fifths of Plants are Going to Go Extinct

Global warming is both vicious and uncertain. While we don’t know exactly how much it will affect our planet over the next few years, the question doesn’t seem to be “if” but rather “how much?” Scientists have recently speculated that many more species than previously anticipated will go extinct in the near future, inflating numbers to a much larger estimate than previously imagined.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Two Fifths of Plants are Going to Go Extinct | Definition Match

Match the words to the correct definition

Two Fifths of Plants are Going to Go Extinct | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Two Fifths of Plants are Going to Go Extinct | True or False

Decide if the statement is true or false.

 

Full Text:

“Scientists all over the world are trying to give names to new plants before they are made extinct.
According to the Royal Botanical Gardens in Kew (England), plants can be used in the future for medicine, fuel and food. Plants are extremely important for the future of humans on Earth.
Species of plants are beginning to disappear due partly to climate change and partly to humans destroying many natural habitats across the world.
New studies have shown that two-fifths of the Earth’s plants are at risk of extinction. This study was conducted by more than 200 scientists in 42 countries. This research was presented on the day of the United Nations summit, which asked world leaders to take action against the loss of biodiversity.
Only a very small number of plants are being used as food and biofuels at the present time, and yet more than 7000 of them are actually eligible. This is extremely important, as many people are starving due to poverty and the global pandemic.
Around 2500 plants could also provide energy for humans, but only six crops – maize, sugarcane, soybean, palm oil, rapeseed and wheat – are currently being used.
In terms of statistics, scientists have announced that the risk of extinction is now a lot higher than they previously thought. In 2016, it was estimated that 21% of plants would become extinct. Now, it is around 39.4% – which would equal to 140,000 species!
Future medicine would really suffer due to overharvesting, with an estimated 723 plants predicted to go extinct for this reason.
In 2019, 1942 plants and 1886 fungi were discovered by scientists. This includes many species that might be valuable as food, drink, medicine, or material.”