Past Participle in Question Phrases

In today’s post we will be learning all about the past participle in question phrases! If you use the phrase “Have you ever…” it is essential to put the following verb in the form of a past participle. Here is an example of the difference:

  • Instead of saying:
    • Have you ever went to California before?
  • Say:
    • Have you ever been to California before?

The past participle normally accompanies another verb in this case the word “have”. The past participle is typically referred to as the third form of the verb and can often be made by adding on these endings : ed, d, or t.

For example:

  • Sleep : slept : slept
  • Jump : jumped : jumped
  • Wear: wore : worn
  • Be : was/were : been

As you can see, sometimes the past participle is exactly the same as the regular past tense but other times things can be more difficult if the verb is irregular! For that reason, it will be useful to look specifically at a list of verbs that are irregular in the past participle so that you can begin to memorize them:

Here is a long list of irregular verbs: https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/support-files/50_common_irregular_verbs_list.pdf

However below I have compiled a list of the top 10 most used irregular verbs where in the past participle is different from the regular past tense!

 

  1. Be : was/were : been
  2. Become: became: become
  3. Drink: drank: drunk
  4. Do : did: done
  5. Eat: ate: eaten
  6. Give: gave: given
  7. Write: wrote: written
  8. Wear: wore: worn
  9. Speak: spoke: spoken
  10. Sing: sang: sung

Let’s practice using some of these new irregular verbs!

Past Participle Quiz

Try and conjugate the following verbs into the past participle.

Learn through Summer Songs!

Today you’ll learn some fun English phrases through music! We’ll explore the song “Summer Loving” from the movie “Grease.” As we enjoy the catchy tune, we’ll find phrasal verbs and idiomatic expressions. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or a beginner, music offers a vibrant and melodious approach to enriching your language skills. Let the warm melodies of “Summer Loving” serenade you as we set sail towards a language adventure that’s bound to leave you singing, “Tell me more, tell me more”!

Before we listen, we must learn important phrases  from the song!

“I met a girl, crazy for me”
Crazy for me: To be Crazy for means to be extremely infatuated or in love with someone. In this context, it means the girl in the song is deeply attracted to the boy.

“Summer days driftin’ away”
Driftin’ away:
Drifting away literally means to move or be carried slowly and gradually in a specific direction. In the song, it suggests that summer days are passing by slowly and fading away. 

“Summer lovin’, had me a blast”
Had me a blast: To have had a great and enjoyable time or experience. In the song, it implies that the summer was full of excitement and fun.

 “Was it love at first sight?”
Love at first sight: If you choose to memorize any phrase from this song this should be the one! Love at first sight. The experience of falling in love with someone instantly upon meeting them for the first time.

“We went strollin’, drank lemonade”
Strollin’: To walk in a leisurely or relaxed manner. In the song, it likely refers to taking a leisurely walk with someone during the summer.

 “We made out under the dock”
Made out: To engage in passionate kissing or intimate physical contact with someone, often suggesting romantic involvement.
Dock: A platform or structure extending from the land out into the water, typically used for boarding boats. In the song, it may suggest a romantic encounter under the dock by the water. 

“Summer dreams ripped at the seams”
Seams: The lines or stitches where two pieces of fabric or material are sewn together. In this context, it could refer to the end of the summer when things start coming apart or ending.

Now, let’s sing together before putting the vocabulary learned into practice!

Summer Nights Lyric:

[The boys]
Summer lovin’, had me a blast
Summer lovin’, happened so fast
I met a girl crazy for me
Met a boy cute as can be

[The girls]
Summer days driftin’ away
To, uh oh, those summer nights

[The boys]
Well-a, well-a, well-a, huh

[The girls]
Tell me more, tell me more
Did you get very far?
Tell me more, tell me more
Like, does he have a car?

[The boys]
Uh huh, uh huh, uh huh, uh huh

[The girls]
Tell me more, tell me more
Was it love at first sight?
Tell me more, tell me more
Did she put up a fight?

[The boys]
Uh huh, uh huh, uh huh, uh huh

[The girls]
Took her bowlin’ in the arcade
We went strollin’, drank lemonade
We made out under the dock
We stayed up until ten o’clock

[The boys]
Summer fling, don’t mean a thing
But, uh oh, those summer nights

[The girls]
Tell me more, tell me more
Was it love at first sight?
Tell me more, tell me more
Like, does he have a car?

[The boys]
Uh huh, uh huh, uh huh, uh huh

[The girls]
Summer dreams ripped at the seams
But, oh, those summer nights

Learn through Summer Songs Quiz

Try and fill in the blanks of the following sentences using your newly learned vocabulary words:

Adjectives that end in ED vs those that end in ING

Today you will learn all about the differences between adjectives that end in ED versus ING in the English language.

Look at the following two examples to understand more clearly what I’m talking about:
– I am really excited to go to the movies this evening!
– This movie is a thriller. It is very exciting.

Can you see the difference? While both sentences use the same base word in the adjective, changing the ending of the adjective from ED to ING also changes the meaning of the adjective slightly.

We typically use adjectives ending in ED to describe feelings or emotions.

Here are some examples:

– My sister is very interested in studying medicine.
– In math class I easily become confused.
– After work, I get so tired.

Contrastingly, we use adjectives ending in ING to describe the characteristics of situations or things. That is to say, the things or people that make you feel a certain way.

For example:

– This book is so boring, I am not interested at all!
– I feel bored when I read this book.
– The ending of the book was very surprising! I did not expect things to conclude like that.
– I was surprised by the ending.
– Horror movies are very frightening, I cannot watch them alone.
– Horror movies make me feel frightened.

ING adjectives can also be used for people but be aware that it changes the meaning of what you are trying to say quite a bit!

Here is an example:
– Laura is very boring. (This sentence means, I do not find Laura interesting)
– Laura is bored. (This sentence means Laura is not interested in something!)

Adjectives that end in ED vs those that end in ING - Quiz

Let’s practice putting the difference into use! Try and choose between ING or ED for the following adjectives based on their context.