Reading Comprehension: The History of Guinness

Guiness is an Irish beer which is enjoyed by millions of people around the world every year, and is probably the most recognizable name in the beer industry. So why is it so popular? Today’s English blog post will go into the history of the beer and how it has become a giant in the sector.
In 1759, at the age of 34, Arthur Guinness signed a lease for the St. James’s Gate Brewery, Dublin. He leased the brewery for 9000 years at an annual rent of £45. The brewery was only 4 acres in size, disused, and had little brewing equipment. In any case, Arthur quickly built up a successful business and by 1769 he had begun to export his beer to England.
In the 1770s, Guiness began brewing ‘porter’, a new type of English beer, invented in London in 1722 by a brewer named Ralph Harwood. Porter was different from ale because it was brewed using roasted barley, giving the beer a dark ruby colour and rich aroma. Arthur’s porter was successful and in 1799 he decided to stop brewing ale altogether, and concentrate on porter alone.
Arthur Guinness brewed different types of porter for different tastes, including a special export beer called ‘West India Porter’. This beer is still brewed today and is now known as GUINNESS Foreign Extra Stout. It accounts for 45% of all GUINNESS sales globally and is popular in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean.
By the time Arthur died in 1803, he had built a successful brewing business, with a promising export trade.
At the end of the 20th century, GUINNESS had become an international brand and the largest brewery in the world. In 1901 a laboratory was established; using science to enhance generations of brewing craft.
The brewery at Park Royal in London proved successful and overseas breweries for Guiness were built in Nigeria (1962), Malaysia (1965), Cameroun (1970), and Ghana (1971). New licences were also issued to brewers in other countries so that Guiness could be brewed locally. At the end of the 20th century, Guiness was being brewed in 49 countries, and sold in over 150.
A new research and development facility was built in 1964 and made for more innovations. Guiness Draught in Can was launched in 1988 with new packaging innovation. This process brought Guiness Draught into the home for the first time.
GUINNESS Stout today is sold in over 150 countries around the world and 10 million glasses are enjoyed daily around the world.

The History of Guinness | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

The History of Guinness | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

Adapted from this article.

 

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