Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit

Introduction:

When you’re living off grid like a Hobbit, people are going to want to take a trip to the Shire to see how you’re doing. And who doesn’t love a Hobbit? Lord of the Rings was filmed in New Zealand but one man has brought the idea of Hobbit homes to the UK, though he claims never to have seen the movies. Interestingly, he doesn’t mention not having read the books!

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it’s doubtless a piece of your daily routine that can’t go ignored.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

So that’s all for the introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit | Definition Match

Match the following words with the correct definitions.

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text for Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit:

Stuart Grant, now 90 years old, moved into the cottage he bought as a wreck with no roof and no doors in 1984 while he was renovating a house, but found it was so satisfying doing DIY on the quirky building which dated back 200 years, that he decided to make it his home.

He does not have a mobile phone or use the internet and no longer drives due to his age, but he loves getting out and meeting people, which is good considering he has been inundated with visitors.
Grant states that he has never watched Lord of the Rings and that is only a coincidence that the front door is almost the same shape and same kind of wood.

The old house had doorways, but no doors; window frames, but no windows, and there was no roof either. Outside there were only cows, chickens, and a donkey as neighbors. Building everything by hand, he described as working in “slow motion,” while living in a shed near to the cabin. He cut the wood from fallen trees and collected stones from the river for the stonework.

As the tourists began coming they would routinely apologize for disturbing him and say they would feel better if there were a collection box. He eventually acquiesced but insists no one has to put anything in it.

English Placement Test- Discover your English level by completing the test

Introduction

Interested in knowing how well-versed in English grammar you are? Find out your English proficiency level by taking our multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank test.

How the Points Work

The test is scored according to a rating system, with difficult questions awarding more points than easier ones.

There are a possible 121 points across 33 questions. The English proficiency scale is:

A1: 0-12 points. Your English is at an elementary level! It’s necessary to expand your knowledge.
A2: 13-37 points. It’s a struggle to participate in discussions even though you have a fair grasp of the fundamentals.
B1: 38-78 points. You’re speaking at an intermediate level. Although you’ve got a great base, you struggle with challenging words, sentences, and subjects.
B2: 79-102 points. You speak at a less advanced level. You’re an expert at the fundamentals, what’s important, and you communicate clearly. You occasionally struggle with more complicated debates, but can usually get by using straightforward language and fundamental concepts.
C1: 103-115 points. You’re able to carry on conversations with native speakers despite having certain lexical gaps. You generally have excellent grammar.
C2: 116-121 points. You’re fluent in colloquial idioms, proverbs, and intricate grammar structures.

The moment has come to take the test!

English Placement Test

Try out the following English language quiz to test your skills and find out your level!

Obviously, compared to your actual level, this is a very low one. At Scrambled Eggs, before beginning a new course, we invite the students to complete a free oral exam with one of our teachers to determine their actual English proficiency level.

Check out our language blog if you want to learn more. You’ll find lots of English activities to help you learn and improve your language skills. Everything from simple grammar drills to fascinating Ted Talks given by some of the world’s most well-known figures! If videos are your speed, check out our Learn English with the News vlog.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees

There are many explanations: isolation among the elderly, rising rents almost anywhere near a coastal city, average life-expectancy increasing, an aging population, decreased birth rate, rising college tuition… While this seems less common in countries like Italy, it is a huge problem in the United States.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.

Young Adults Renting Next Door to Retirees | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

America’s latest housing trend is not about décor or “open concepts.” It’s about the rise of intergenerational—separated by at least one generation—roommates.

There are many explanations: isolation among the elderly, rising rents almost anywhere near a coastal city, average life-expectancy increasing, an aging population, decreased birth rate, rising college tuition… The fact is that older folks have space available, and tend to be happier with a young person around.

In one case, an opera singer and other musicians lived rent-free in a retirement community. How? They agreed to perform concerts for the residents occasionally.

Biologically, this type of living arrangement is kind of humanity’s natural state.

While almost all animals rapidly die off after they become too old to procreate, humans are capable of living decades beyond infertility.

Scholars think this is because our intelligence and life experiences, imparted into the next generation, act as another way to guarantee our genetics are transferred. For example, if you can live long enough to explain to your children and grandchildren which mushrooms they can eat, which snakes are poisonous, etc., those people will have a better chance of survival than a family who lost their parents early on.