Five links on animals for kids

Kids love animals which is why it is a great way to get them excited about English, here are five useful links to get them started.

Here is an interactive board game the whole family can play. The chips and the dice move. For more advanced learners you can take this game further by asking them whether or not they like the animal they have landed on and get them to make the sound.

 

https://www.eslkidsgames.com/esl-board-games-interactive/animals

Here is a great game to help with spelling:

https://www.eslkidsgames.com/animals-vocabulary-game

A fun interactive video:

https://en.islcollective.com/video-lessons/animals-vocabulary-1

For more advanced learners this description game (animal category) can be good to learn characteristics of the animals:

https://www.gamestolearnenglish.com/describer/

 

Here there are games to practice spelling, grammar and vocabulary all on the topic of animals:

https://www.mes-games.com/animals1.php

 

There are many little things you could do at home to help your children learn animal vocabulary in English. Why not take a trip to the zoo and ask them how many animals they can name. Ask them to describe their favourite animal in English or their pets if they have any. Hearing parents speak English will also give them a little boost of confidence in trying out the language.

Genetically Modified Pigs To Be Used For Heart Transplants

Germany is planning to clone and breed genetically modified pigs to use for heart transplants in humans. This has generated a lot of controversy regarding animal rights, but not only. The practice is believed to be both legally and ethically questionable.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Genetically Modified Pigs To Be Used For Heart Transplants | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Genetically Modified Pigs To Be Used For Heart Transplants | Fill in the Blank

Fill out the text below with the correct answers.

Genetically Modified Pigs To Be Used For Heart Transplants | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

German scientists plan to clone and then breed genetically-modified pigs this year as heart donors for humans. One scientist at a university in Munich said his team is aiming to have the new species ready for transplant trials by 2025.

In the first surgery of its kind, in January of 2022, transplanted a heart from a pig into a terminally ill man. His doctors say he is responding well. The work has triggered a heated debate in a country with one of Europe’s lowest organ donation rates and a strong animal rights movement.

The first generation of pigs should be born this year. Their hearts would be tested in baboons before the team sought approval for a human clinical trial.

Supporters say animal donors could help shorten that list, but opponents say the technology rides roughshod over the animals’ rights, effectively degrading pigs to the status of organ factories while the monkeys used in transplant experiments die in agony.

In February 2019, a petition by German group Doctors Against Animal Experiments demanded a ban on xenotransplantation research and collected over 57,000 signatures. A spokesperson for the Animal Welfare Association called the practice “ethically very questionable,” saying, “Animals should not serve as spare parts for humans” because they have “the same needs, fears and also rights.”

Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize

Sometimes science is weird. The Ig-Nobel Prize is awarded to scientists whose research goes beyond the traditional experiment. This year’s winner? A team that hung rhinos upside-down to measure their blood flow! It’s tough being a rhino these days.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article

Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize | True of False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

An experiment that hung rhinoceroses upside down to see what effect it had on the animals has been awarded one of this year’s Ig Nobel prizes.

This prize, often considered a joke that should make you think, is presented by real Nobel laureates. The prize: a trophy they had to assemble from a PDF print-out and a cash prize in the form of a counterfeit 10 trillion dollar Zimbabwean banknote.

Other recipients of this year’s prize included a group who studied the bacteria in chewing gum stuck to pavement; another studied how to control cockroaches on submarines; a third studied communication between humans and cats.

What could be more important (or daft) than hanging 12 rhinos upside down for 10 minutes from helicopters? The rhino study does exactly this. The team wanted to know if the animals’ health might be compromised while slung in that position from a crane. Surprisingly, this experiment had not been conducted before.

Their evidence, in fact, showed that rhinos coped better in this upside-down position than lying down on their chest or on their side. As it turns out, being upside-down for a rhino is much like standing up normally, their lungs were equally perfused. It will be exciting to see which animals are next.