Adverbs Part 1: Modifying verbs

Learning new grammar topics can be very tricky. Fortunately, you have our blogs to help you along the way! In this blog, we are going to talk about adverbs and how to use them.

 

What are adverbs? Chances are you have already used them! In this blog we will talk about the first way we can use them is to describe verbs, which is what we will learn about today.

 

Adverbs can often modify verbs – which means that they describe the way an action is happening. Let’s see some examples.

 

John dances gracefully when he sings.

My doctor spoke to me seriously yesterday.

I arrived early to my meeting today.

 

In these examples, we can see that the adverb asks: in what way:

How does John sing? He sings gracefully!

How did my doctor speak? He spoke seriously!

Did I arrive on time? No, I arrived early!

Let’s test your knowledge with a little quiz on adverbs!

Modifying verbs | QUIZ

Choose the correct answer.

Did these questions go smoothly for you? Let us know in the comment section below! We are always here to help if you need.

Pokémon GO Might Reduce Mild Depression According to Study | Learn English with the News

Pokémon defined an entire generation in the 90s and remains extremely popular to this day. Likewise, the Pokémon Go app redefined mobile games. It successfully deployed a new technology: augmented reality. It got people out of the house and made them more active; now, studies are beginning to see largely positive effects from this.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article

Pokémon GO | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Pokémon GO | Fill in the Blank

Fill out the text below with the correct answers.

Pokémon GO | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

Playing location-based games, such as the augmented reality game Pokémon GO, may alleviate non-clinical forms of mild depression, a new study has found. Location-based games are those that revolve and progress around a player’s physical location. This is often monitored using GPS technology. In a new study by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), researchers examined the effect of location-based mobile gaming on local depression trends.

Using the introduction of Pokémon GO as a case study, the researchers exploited the staggered release of the game over 50 weeks in 2016 into 166 regions in 12 English-speaking countries.

They measured local depression levels using Google Trends data to calculate internet searches for depression-related terms such as “depression,” “stress,” and “anxiety.” Using internet search data is a well-established mechanism for measuring mild depression in medical and public health literature. They found the release of Pokémon GO was associated with a significant short-term decrease in depression-related internet searches.

The authors argue that playing these types of games may reduce mild depression because they encourage outdoor physical activity, face-to-face socialization and exposure to nature. All factors which have all been shown as having a positive impact on mental health.

In the paper, published in the Journal of Management Information Systems, the authors were keen to stress that their findings only relate to those suffering from mild depression—not chronic or severe depressive disorders.

Research Suggests Mushrooms Talk to Each Other | Learn English with the News

New research suggests that mushrooms may be able to communicate with each other with a vocabulary of up to 50 “words.” We’re skeptical, but who are we to question those who are so wise in the ways of science! Super Mario, what are you doing!?!?

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

 

Mushrooms | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Mushrooms | Fill In The Blank

Fill out the text below with the correct answers.

Mushrooms | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

For people wanting their minds blown, the kingdom of fungi is a never-ending box of tricks.
Mycologists studying the underground filaments of fungi are observing electrical signals similar to a nervous system. This is a normal phenomenon, except that they found the signals were remarkably similar to human language.
When filaments, called “hyphae,” of a wood-digesting fungal species discover a bit of wood to munch on underground, the hyphae begin to light up with “spikes” of electrical signals that reach out to the hyphae of other individuals, and even trees.
One fungi had a series of electrical spikes of almost identical length to English words, while another fungi had spikes even more closely identical to the average word length in the Greek language. Around fifty “words” could be identified based on repetition.
Some scientists are skeptical that the research was done looking for ‘language’, suggesting that this puts a shroud of exaggeration and overexcitement about the findings. To his credit, Professor Adamatzky explained that it could be simply that the electrically-charged tips of hyphae were just creating electromagnetic reactions as they explore the forest underground.
It is not the first piece of science that suggests life outside Animalia communicates with language. Tree scientist Peter Wohlleben believes trees produce scents instead of words, and that soon a computer will be able to detect and attach purposes to the scents, and translate them into words.