Lab-Grown Blood Given in World-First Clinical Trial

Introduction:

For the first time in history lab-grown blood has been given to patients in a clinical trial. This blood is expected to be used to help doctors treat rare blood disorders in patients that require blood transfusions.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it’s doubtless a piece of your daily routine that can’t go ignored.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

So that’s all for the introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Lab-Grown Blood Given in World-First Clinical Trial | Definition Match

Match the following words to the correct definitions.

Lab-Grown Blood Given in World-First Clinical Trial | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.

Lab-Grown Blood Given in World-First Clinical Trial | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text for Lab-Grown Blood Given in World-First Clinical Trial:

Scientists have grown human red blood cells in a lab for the first time, and carried out a clinical trial to test it on patients.

How does it work? A donor gives a sample of blood. Then scientists use a process that encourages stem cells in the donated blood to become new red blood cells. This opens the door for transfusion treatments for people who have rare blood types.

For the majority of blood transfusions (for A, B, O, and AB blood types), hospitals will still rely on people donating. But what if a patient needs a blood transfusion from the “Bombay” blood group (a rare blood type that contains H antigens)?

Certain other diseases, such as sickle-cell anemia, require regular blood transfusions. A transfusion with the wrong blood type will be viewed as foreign and attacked by the immune system.

In this trial, tiny amounts of lab-grown blood containing radioactive particles were given to ten healthy patients so they can track how long the blood remains in the bloodstream. Red blood cells typically last 120 days. The body then replaces them. Because lab-grown blood only contains new cells, it may be possible for smaller, less frequent transplants.

Florida Asks Supreme Court to Rule on Social Media Law

Introduction:

Social media is a place that comes with a lot of benefits, but also a lot of risks. It’s often used for learning and self-improvement, sharing your life with others, chatting about hobbies, but on the other side of this people also use it to promote violence, sow discord, or spread hate in the name of free speech. Florida is now asking the Supreme Court to take action.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it’s doubtless a piece of your daily routine that can’t go ignored.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

So that’s all for the introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Florida Asks Supreme Court to Rule on Social Media Law | Definition Match

Definition Match (10 Questions)

Florida Asks Supreme Court to Rule on Social Media Law | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the Blank (10 Questions)

Florida Asks Supreme Court to Rule on Social Media Law | True or False

True or False (5 Questions)

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text:

Florida has asked the Supreme Court to rule on whether states can force social media companies to host content they would prefer removing. This is setting up a potential landmark battle over digital speech rights and content moderation that could reshape the country’s First Amendment relationship.

Florida’s attorney general argued that the ability of major social media platforms to promote the views of some users over others means it is critical for justices to weigh in. One Florida law is at the center of this controversy. The law in question allows political candidates to sue social media companies if they are blocked or removed from platforms longer than 14 days.

Opponents representing the tech industry had sued to block that law, arguing it infringed on private companies’ First Amendment rights. Earlier this year, a federal appeals court agreed with that reasoning, ultimately leading to Florida’s petition for Supreme Court intervention.

Legal experts believe that if the law survives being challenged, tech companies could be forced to host spam, hate speech and other material that is legal but problematic. It may also rewrite decades of First Amendment precedent that prohibited governments from compelling private parties to host speech.

English Placement Test- Discover your English level by completing the test

Introduction

Interested in knowing how well-versed in English grammar you are? Find out your English proficiency level by taking our multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank test.

How the Points Work

The test is scored according to a rating system, with difficult questions awarding more points than easier ones.

There are a possible 121 points across 33 questions. The English proficiency scale is:

A1: 0-12 points. Your English is at an elementary level! It’s necessary to expand your knowledge.
A2: 13-37 points. It’s a struggle to participate in discussions even though you have a fair grasp of the fundamentals.
B1: 38-78 points. You’re speaking at an intermediate level. Although you’ve got a great base, you struggle with challenging words, sentences, and subjects.
B2: 79-102 points. You speak at a less advanced level. You’re an expert at the fundamentals, what’s important, and you communicate clearly. You occasionally struggle with more complicated debates, but can usually get by using straightforward language and fundamental concepts.
C1: 103-115 points. You’re able to carry on conversations with native speakers despite having certain lexical gaps. You generally have excellent grammar.
C2: 116-121 points. You’re fluent in colloquial idioms, proverbs, and intricate grammar structures.

The moment has come to take the test!

English Placement Test

Try out the following English language quiz to test your skills and find out your level!

Obviously, compared to your actual level, this is a very low one. At Scrambled Eggs, before beginning a new course, we invite the students to complete a free oral exam with one of our teachers to determine their actual English proficiency level.

Check out our language blog if you want to learn more. You’ll find lots of English activities to help you learn and improve your language skills. Everything from simple grammar drills to fascinating Ted Talks given by some of the world’s most well-known figures! If videos are your speed, check out our Learn English with the News vlog.