Wh Questions

What’s the importance of asking a question? Why do we need to ask questions to people? When is the best time to ask a question? Where do we usually ask questions? Who do we often ask questions to?

All of these are wonderful questions when we look at the context of questions. Here is a breakdown/review of the major indicators we use for questions:

1. Who:

Use “who” when you want to ask about a person or people.

Example: “Who is your teacher?”

2. What:

Use “what” when you want to ask about things, objects, actions, or activities.

Example: “What is your favorite color?”

3. Where:

Use “where” when you want to ask about a place or location.

Example: “Where do you live?”

4. When:

Use “when” when you want to ask about a specific time or moment.

Example: “When is your birthday?”

5. Why:

Use “why” when you want to ask for the reason or cause behind something.

Example: “Why are you late?”

Now, here are some quick activities you can do to refresh and practice your knowledge on questions and how to use them:

Asking Questions Quizz 1

 Fill in the Blank the following sentences:


Asking Questions Quizz 2

Multiple choice! Choose the right option among these 5:

The Difference Between its and it’s

Finding the difference between its and it’s is a common very common challenge, even for English speakers.  But here’s an exercise and lesson that will help guide you through the process of using its versus it’s:

Its: Without the apostrophe, this word is a possessive pronoun, his or her, for objects/things without gender.

 

  • The word its is often used in reference to something owned by a person or thing previously mentioned in the sentence, such as:
  • The table made a sound in its legs when he put his plate down.

The word its can also be used in reference to a noun without a defined gender.   Choose its when you want to give something ownership, for example:

  • My mom yelled when the dog spilled its water bowl.

 

It’s: With an apostrophe, this word is a contraction, meaning it is or is has

 

  • It’s, happens to be a contraction meaning it is or it has.

 

  • It’s been two hours since he texted me back
  • It’s the relationship that I have with my students that really makes me happy

 

All in all, this process can be tricky, but with practice and reading, you will be on your merry way to mastering these two words.

 

It’s about time you figure out how to find the difference between it’s and its!  I know you can do it, even if your brain has its bad and good days.  Here are some exercises to help:

 

Difference Between its and it’s quiz

Fill in the blank for the following sentences:

Present Perfect Continuous

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Present Perfect Continuous
When something starts in the past and continues into the present, we use this verb tense. The present perfect continuous tense is generally used to describe actions or conditions that began in the past but are still going on or have recently stopped. You can use present perfect continuous in positive and negative situations. For example, “I have been watching TV all day”, or “Have we not been resting long enough?”

There are a few different situations when present perfect continuous is often used:

Situation Example
Emphasizing length of time “I have been waiting here for hours”
Conveying unfinished actions “I have been watching the movie you suggested last week”
Explaining the result of an action “We have been baking all day, so the kitchen is a mess”

How to form Present Perfect Continuous Statements:
Subject + have been + gerund (ing)
Example: I have been writing this script since 2018.

Present Perfect Continuous Quiz

Complete the following sentences using present perfect continuous.
Example: He _______ (work) here for ten years.
ANSWER: He has been working here for ten years.