US Rejects Regulations for Banning “Killer Robots”

Drones are being increasingly used throughout the Middle East and North Africa. This relatively new technology has few regulations and presents a lot of interesting challenges for our world. The United States, as a leader in and proponent of this technology, does not want to see it become regulated, for many reasons. But what happens when we start to see them over our houses, as is the case in Italy, where they are being used to track movements of people during the Pandemic.

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The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

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Adapted from this article

US Rejects Regulations for Banning “Killer Robots” | Definition Match

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US Rejects Regulations for Banning “Killer Robots” | Fill in the Blank

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US Rejects Regulations for Banning “Killer Robots” | True or False

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Full text:

The US has rejected calls for a {binding} agreement regulating or {banning} the use of “killer robots,” instead proposing a “code of conduct” at the United Nations. India—on the border with Pakistan, one of the countries hit hardest by drones—likewise, criticized the idea of a legally binding agreement.

At a meeting in Geneva that was focused on finding common ground on the use of lethal autonomous weapons, a US official {balked} at the idea of regulating their use through a “legally-binding instrument,” believing a code of conduct would better promote responsible behavior and {compliance} with international laws. However, campaigners disagreed.

The United Nations has been {hosting} diplomatic talks in Geneva since 2017 with the aim of reaching an agreement on how to address the use of “killer robots.” {Activists} and a number of countries have called for an {all-out} ban on any weapons that could use lethal force without a human {overseeing} the process and making the final kill order.

The UN chief joined the {call} for a ban, but so far countries do not even agree on whether there is a need to regulate the weapons. Clare Conboy of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots said, “States have a historic opportunity to {ensure} meaningful human control over the use of force and prevent a world in which machines make life and death decisions.”

 

The Metaverse Is Already Here, And It’s Here to Stay

The Metaverse is here. It’s been around for a little while, actually. But is it a good thing? Facebook is among the first companies to push for its existence and hopes that it will continue to draw younger generations of users. Every technology has its downsides.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises on our website.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

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Adapted from this article

The Metaverse Is Already Here, And It’s Here to Stay | Definition Match

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The Metaverse Is Already Here, And It’s Here to Stay | Fill in the Blank

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The Metaverse Is Already Here, And It’s Here to Stay | True or False

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Full Text:

Mark Zuckerberg changed Facebook to Meta, as users of WhatsApp or Instagram will have noticed, asserting that the metaverse is not only the company’s next chapter, but “the next chapter for the internet.”
The word and concept aren’t new. The term itself was coined in the 1992 science-fiction book Snow Crash, in which people use avatars to explore an online world. A number of small metaverses have since developed, where people meet, play games and even watch live shows.
The metaverse is a place where people can do real life things — like work out, meet with colleagues, or take a class — but all online and in virtual reality. Anyone can strap on a virtual reality headset in their living room and enter an alternate online universe.
Who should own the metaverse? There are many questions about what role the company should play in building the metaverse. Meta’s vice president of metaverse is adamant that the company doesn’t want to dictate what’s created within, but others are not so sure. Instead, the vision is that Meta provides the backbone for the metaverse in which everyone is invited to come, play, build and experiment.
Do people really want the future to be the metaverse? Facebook is fretting about becoming moot as users age. So staying on top of the next big technology trend, like the metaverse, to attract younger people may be key to Meta’s survival. Zuckerberg sees big things ahead for both the metaverse and his company.
 

Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize

Sometimes science is weird. The Ig-Nobel Prize is awarded to scientists whose research goes beyond the traditional experiment. This year’s winner? A team that hung rhinos upside-down to measure their blood flow! It’s tough being a rhino these days.

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The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

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Adapted from this article

Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize | Definition Match

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Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize | Fill in the Blank

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Upside-Down Rhino Research Wins A 2021 Ig Nobel Prize | True of False

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Full Text:

An experiment that hung rhinoceroses upside down to see what effect it had on the animals has been awarded one of this year’s Ig Nobel prizes.

This prize, often considered a joke that should make you think, is presented by real Nobel laureates. The prize: a trophy they had to assemble from a PDF print-out and a cash prize in the form of a counterfeit 10 trillion dollar Zimbabwean banknote.

Other recipients of this year’s prize included a group who studied the bacteria in chewing gum stuck to pavement; another studied how to control cockroaches on submarines; a third studied communication between humans and cats.

What could be more important (or daft) than hanging 12 rhinos upside down for 10 minutes from helicopters? The rhino study does exactly this. The team wanted to know if the animals’ health might be compromised while slung in that position from a crane. Surprisingly, this experiment had not been conducted before.

Their evidence, in fact, showed that rhinos coped better in this upside-down position than lying down on their chest or on their side. As it turns out, being upside-down for a rhino is much like standing up normally, their lungs were equally perfused. It will be exciting to see which animals are next.