Hydrogen Fuel out of Thin Air?

Introduction:

Hydrogen fuel is an interesting alternative energy. One team has been working on a device that is able to capture hydrogen from the air which can then be transferred into fuel cells and used by vehicles. The coolest part? The only byproduct of hydrogen fuel is water.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it’s doubtless a piece of your daily routine that can’t go ignored.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

So that’s all for the introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Hydrogen Fuel out of Thin Air | Definition Match

Match the following words with the correct definitions.

Hydrogen Fuel out of Thin Air | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.

Hydrogen Fuel out of Thin Air | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

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Full text for Hydrogen Fuel out of Thin Air?:

A device that can harvest water from the air and provide hydrogen fuel — entirely powered by solar energy — has long been a scientific dream, but it’s now close to reality. One chemical engineer and his team have made a significant step towards bringing this vision to fruition by developing an ingenious yet simple system.
It combines semiconductor-based technology with novel electrodes that have two key characteristics: they are porous, maximizing contact with water in the air; and transparent, maximizing sunlight exposure for the semiconductor coating.
When this device is exposed to sunlight, it pulls water from the air and produces hydrogen gas, which can then be injected into vehicles with hydrogen fuel cell batteries for green combustion.
In their research for renewable fossil-free fuels they took inspiration from the way plants are able to convert sunlight into chemical energy using carbon dioxide from the air. A plant essentially harvests carbon dioxide and water from its environment, and with the extra boost of energy from sunlight, can transform these molecules into sugars and starches, a process known as photosynthesis.
The researchers nevertheless proved that hydrogen gas can be produced via sunlight and moisture in the air.

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit

Introduction:

When you’re living off grid like a Hobbit, people are going to want to take a trip to the Shire to see how you’re doing. And who doesn’t love a Hobbit? Lord of the Rings was filmed in New Zealand but one man has brought the idea of Hobbit homes to the UK, though he claims never to have seen the movies. Interestingly, he doesn’t mention not having read the books!

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it’s doubtless a piece of your daily routine that can’t go ignored.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

So that’s all for the introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit | Definition Match

Match the following words with the correct definitions.

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.

Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text for Living Off-Grid Like a Hobbit:

Stuart Grant, now 90 years old, moved into the cottage he bought as a wreck with no roof and no doors in 1984 while he was renovating a house, but found it was so satisfying doing DIY on the quirky building which dated back 200 years, that he decided to make it his home.

He does not have a mobile phone or use the internet and no longer drives due to his age, but he loves getting out and meeting people, which is good considering he has been inundated with visitors.
Grant states that he has never watched Lord of the Rings and that is only a coincidence that the front door is almost the same shape and same kind of wood.

The old house had doorways, but no doors; window frames, but no windows, and there was no roof either. Outside there were only cows, chickens, and a donkey as neighbors. Building everything by hand, he described as working in “slow motion,” while living in a shed near to the cabin. He cut the wood from fallen trees and collected stones from the river for the stonework.

As the tourists began coming they would routinely apologize for disturbing him and say they would feel better if there were a collection box. He eventually acquiesced but insists no one has to put anything in it.

Edible Drones Could Keep Disaster Survivors in Remote Areas Alive

Introduction:

Edible drones! It’s what’s for dinner. Researchers have developed a new kind of drone that makes use of edible materials and can be sent to help vicitms trapped inside of disaster areas.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it’s doubtless a piece of your daily routine that can’t go ignored.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

So that’s all for the introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Edible Drones Could Keep Disaster Survivors in Remote Areas Alive | Definition Match

Match the following words to the correct definitions.

Edible Drones Could Keep Disaster Survivors in Remote Areas Alive | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blank with the correct word.

Edible Drones Could Keep Disaster Survivors in Remote Areas Alive | True or False

Decide if the statements are true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text for Edible Drones Could Keep Disaster Survivors in Remote Areas Alive:

Drones can be crucial during natural disasters. They can transport supplies to people in need. But what if they themselves were made of food? Researchers have developed a small flying craft that has wings made of rice cakes and gelatin.

A team in Switzerland made the wings functional for flight and as cargo at the same time, so the drone could deliver food or medication. To create the wings, rice cakes are laser-cut into hexagons and fixed together using gelatin. The wings are then wrapped in plastic, before being attached to the flying part.
The prototype drone was able to fly 10 meters per second. The team now wants to transform other inedible pieces, suggesting that structural components could be 3D-printed using edible material.

The drones have a wingspan of about 70 centimeters. This means there is enough rice cake and gelatin glue to deliver one breakfast serving. After the wings, there are 80 leftover grams which can be used to deliver vitamins or water.

The research has been documented and is just one application of the group’s research initiative called RoboFood, which seeks to develop edible robots in a way that maximizes both performance and nutritional value.