Learn English with the News – Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache

The fight for or against vaccines has been raging in the UK, and scientists are worried that skepticism could affect the results of specific trials. Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | Fill In The Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Vaccine sceptics might make trials a headache | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text

“It will soon be critical for the NHS to start vaccinating people against flu, to prevent hospitals
being swamped with flu and Covid-19 patients this winter. Large-scale trials of Covid-19
vaccines, already under way in some places, are likely to start in Bradford in the autumn. It's
therefore worrying, says Dr John Wright of the city's Royal Infirmary, that anti-vax conspiracy
theories seem to have flourished in this pandemic.
The numbers of hospital patients continue to slowly decline in the UK, almost down to single
figures this week. There is great relief in Bradford hospital, tempered by the inevitability of a
further spike of infection. You may know of the warning from Game of Thrones – winter is
coming – and never before has that phrase been so ominous. The prediction of a second wave
of Covid-19 in January, with the added layer of an influenza epidemic, is John Wright’s worst
fear. He and his team will be working hard to make sure they vaccinate as many people for flu
as they can in the autumn.
The race for an effective Covid-19 vaccine continues at pace. Over 130 candidate vaccines have
now been developed and more than 30 are in clinical trials, with some showing promising early
signs.
The Bradford Institute of Health Research is one of just five national centres for patient
recruitment to clinical trials, and the staff have lots of expertise with testing new drugs.
However, vaccine trials are a completely different ball game. Rather than trialling new drugs on
a small number of patients with specific diseases they will be testing new vaccines on hundreds
and thousands of healthy volunteers. They have been exploring how they could use sports
centres or community halls to recruit these volunteers, and how they can scale up their
research teams to cope with the numbers.
They had been preparing for two different vaccine trials, only for the companies to pull them
from the UK at the last minute and move them to the Americas. The pandemic fires have been
dampened in Europe, but in the US and Latin America they continue to rage, and if you are
going to test a new vaccine you need countries where the virus is still accelerating.
But despite these two false starts, there will be further trials of other candidate vaccines.
It’s therefore important to win the support of the public so that they sign up to these new trials,
and to do that there is a need to counter some of the growing false news stories that the public
are hearing on community grapevines, which are leading people to believe that the vaccines are
harmful.”

Learn English with the News – Baia: A City That Lies Beneath the Waves

Rome is a city that never ceases to amaze. And scientific discoveries will keep that splendour strong, as the city of Baia continues to shine, even from under water. Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Baia: A City That Lies Beneath the Waves | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Baia: A City That Lies Beneath the Waves | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Baia: A City That Lies Beneath the Waves | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

 

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

“In its heyday, the classical Roman city of Baia was the hedonist Las Vegas of the time, but now its remains are partying beneath the waves. A prominent resort city for centuries, Baia catered to the recreational whims of the rich and powerful among the Roman elite. The city, which was located over natural volcanic vents, was famous for its healing medicinal hot springs which occurred all around the city and were quite easy to build spas over. Some of antiquity’s most powerful figures such as Nero, Cicero, and Caesar were known to have visited the city and a number of them actually built permanent vacation villas there. Unfortunately, the good times were not to last and the city was sacked by a Muslim army in the 8th century. By 1500, the remains of the formerly luxurious town were abandoned. After the city remains were emptied, the water level slowly rose due to the same volcanic vents that were once a draw to the area, and most of the ancient ruins were drowned under the shallow waters of the bay. Today the ancient remains of Baia can be visited in one of the world’s few underwater archaeological parks. Visitors can view the crumbled structures and amazingly preserved statuary of the city through glass-bottomed boats, snorkelling, or even scuba dives which allow people to actually swim amongst the copious ruins. While the city is no longer a resort, its waters still hold wonders.”

5 cose che devi sapere sull’ammissione ai college americani

#1 Ci puoi entrare. Davvero.

L’ammissione al college non è poi così competitiva come si potrebbe pensare. Meno di 100 università negli Stati Uniti sono altamente selettive, il che significa che accettano meno del 25 percento dei candidati. Quasi 500 college con percorsi quadriennali accettano invece oltre il 75 percento dei candidati. Mentre quelli ad ammissione aperta accettano tutti o la maggior parte dei diplomati.

#2 Sei più di un punteggio nei test.

Ai college interessa maggiormente il tuo lavoro svolto al liceo. Cercano studenti che abbiano conseguito ottimi voti in corsi impegnativi. Provano anche a conoscere la tua persona guardando oltre ciò che fai nell’aula di studio. Approfitta delle opportunità come il saggio per l’ammissione e il colloquio per mostrare un quadro più completo di chi sei.

#3 Sei tu che comandi.

Questo è il tuo futuro, e sei al posto di guida. Rimani concentrato su ciò che è importante per te e su ciò che vuoi ottenere dalla tua esperienza universitaria. La pianificazione della tua vita al college a volte può sembrare travolgente, ma se prendi il comando e rimani concentrato sui tuoi obiettivi, puoi far funzionare le cose.

#4 Sei unico.

Dovresti basare la tua scelta su quanto un college si adatti o meno alle tue esigenze. Non preoccuparti di come è classificato in un elenco o di quanto sia famoso. Lo sforzo che metterai e le opportunità che saprai sfruttare una volta arrivato lì saranno più importanti del college che sceglierai. Una volta che ti sei laureato, saranno i tuoi risultati e le tue abilità a contare di più.

#5 Non sei da solo.

Famiglia, insegnanti e amici sono una grande risorsa. Discuti dei tuoi piani riguardo al college con loro e chiedi se puoi aiuto e consigli. Prendi un appuntamento con un consulente scolastico o il tuo preside per parlare del processo di candidatura, delle università adatte a te e delle varie opzioni di aiuto finanziario.

 

Articolo tradotto da qui.