Countable and Uncountable Nouns – English Grammar Exercise

Countable nouns can be counted.

Ex: an orange, three oranges, many oranges.

We can use a/an for singular countable nouns, and some for plural countable nouns. Here are some more examples of sentences with countable nouns. We can also use “many” with countable nouns to describe a quantity.

I have a red car.
She bought some apples at the store.

We saw an elephant at the zoo.

There were many dogs at the park today.

In negative sentences we should use a/an for singular nouns and any for plural nouns.

She doesn’t own a house.
We don’t have any children.

Uncountable cannot be counted.

Ex: milk, water, rice.

We should use “some” when talking about uncountable nouns.

There is some milk in the fridge.
I gave him some money to buy lunch.

In negative sentences, we should use any. We use “much” with uncountable nouns.

There isn’t any rice.
I don’t want any coffee.
We don’t have much money.

So now you’ve learnt about countable and uncountable nouns, why not take our quiz and see how much you remember..?

Countable/Uncountable nouns exercise

Try this practice using a, some, any, much and many!

 

Welcome to Scrambled Eggs, an English school in Milan that aims to help you improve your English in a fun, accessible and easy way. Check out all the English language exercises we’ve compiled in our database over the years, which are broken down into various types of exercise and also split into levels.

Whether you’re taking an English course here in Milan or you simply want to boost your language skills with loads of online English language exercises, Scrambled Eggs is here for you! Check out our vast collection which includes hundreds of exercises for all levels, and if you think there are some exercises, topics or videos we should add more of, be sure to send an email our way at hello@scrambledeggsinglese.it

 

Learn English with Your Kids! – The Very Busy Spider by Eric Carle

Two of the most highly requested areas in English language learning are English for preschoolers (ages 3 – 5) and Business English. Although these areas can seem like polar opposites, they don’t have to be! It often occurs that adults spending all of their time concentrating on Business English miss out on the foundational words and phrases that play an integral part in speaking the language – words which appear frequently in the English directed towards very young learners.
So, in order to help you improve your foundations of English, here are some activities you can do with your children to not only help you to improve your English basics, but also help you to begin introducing English to your young learner.

The Very Busy Spider 

 

You can find the book here.

Read the book or listen to the video, then complete the quizzes with your preschooler!

The Very Busy Spider | Choose the Opposite

Find the correct opposites of the given words.

The Very Busy Spider | Verb and Action Match

Match the verb with the action.

The Very Busy Spider | Animal and Sound Match

Match the sound with the correct animal.

Although, even though, in spite of and despite – English Grammar Exercise

Althougheven thoughin spite of and despite are all used to connect two different concepts or can even be used similarly to ‘nevertheless’, in that one of the ideas makes the other a surprising outcome. They can all be placed at any stage of a sentence.

E.g. Even though I slept for 10 hours, I’m still tired.

I’m still tired, even though I slept for 10 hours.

 The biggest difference between all of these words/phrases is that they are used with alternate sentence structures.

Although/Even Though

After although and even though, we use a subject and then a verb. They have the same meaning, but even though is stronger than although.

For example:

We liked the restaurant, although the service could have been better.
Although I use the car every day, I don’t actually like driving.
Even though they spoke different languages, they somehow communicated effectively.
She got a job in marketing even though she didn’t have any experience.

 

In Spite of/Despite

After in spite of and despite, we use a noun, gerund verb (-ing) or a pronoun.

For example:

He still jumped out of a plane for charity, in spite of his fear.
In spite of their age, my grandparents want to travel the world.
Despite having bad reviews, the movie was excellent.

We arrived late to the airport despite leaving on time.

 It is also very common to put the fact that after both despite and in spite of, followed by a subject and verb.

For example:

In spite of the fact that she always works overtime, she didn’t get the promotion.
Despite the fact that she always works overtime, she didn’t get the promotion.

 

Though

Though is slightly more complicated than the rest, as it is more flexible.

Firstly, it can be used in the same way as although.

For example:

Though I didn’t think I liked classical music, the opera was beautiful.

Although I didn’t think I liked classical music, the opera was beautiful.

However, it is also very common for though to be used at the end of the second sentence. This is a popular way for English speakers to express a contrasting idea or concept. Placing though at the end of the sentence is only used in spoken English and should not be used in formal writing.

For example:

The train arrived late as always. The carriages were extremely clean, though.

I didn’t study for the test at all. I still passed, though!

 

So now you’ve read the rules and seen some examples, do you think you can pass our quiz? Find out now!

 

Although, even though, in spite of and despite | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the correct words/phrases