Learn English with the News – The Pastry AI that Learned to Fight Cancer

Science and food do not have to be mutually exclusive: cancer researchers in Japan have been working with software developers to adapt an innovative computer program that can identify hundreds of different types of pastries at the cash register into a program that can detect cancer cells under a microscope lens.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English language exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored.

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article. 

The Pastry AI that Learned to Fight Cancer | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blank with the correct preposition.

The Pastry AI that Learned to Fight Cancer | Synonyms Match

Match the words with their synonyms.

The Pastry AI that Learned to Fight Cancer | True or False

Decide if the statement is true or false.

 

Full text:

“A software company called Brain has been working with a cancer research center in Kyoto, Japan to adapt software they created for the Japanese bakeries into a program that can detect cancer cells under a microscope lens.

Brain’s software, BakeryScan, was created in 2007 and has since been improved to allow Japan’s bakeries to easily identify different types of pastries at the cash register.

The pastry industry needed this complex software because of Japan’s very diverse food tastes. The country’s long trade history led to its desire for a variety of flavors. For this reason, unlike French or Italian bakeries that offer only a few options, Japanese bakeries offer pastries of all sizes, shapes, flavors, and colors. There are hundreds of different types of pastries in these unique bakeries.

The many different types of pastries caused cashiers to spend months learning the price of each individual pastry based on sight alone. This meant that the checkout process was not only very difficult for cashiers, but also caused long wait times for customers.

Brain, which was founded by computer programmer and software designer Hisashi Kambe, had always worked on projects based on computer visualization capabilities and so to combat this problem at the cash register they created BakeryScan.

BakeryScan is unique because, unlike deep learning software like Google Translate, Siri, and almost every AI system out there, it doesn’t need large amounts of specialized data to make decisions; it is created to understand irregularities like the shadow cast into the middle of a donut hole or the slightly darker color of over-baked bread without needing the input of tens of thousands of similar images.

When a doctor at the Louis Pasteur Center for Medical Research, in Kyoto, saw a television segment about the machine, he realized that cancer cells, under a microscope, looked a lot like bread. He contacted Hisashi Kambe’s company Brain to see how they could collaborate to develop a version of the program that could help pathologists detect cancer cells.

The program they came up with, Cyto-Aiscan, is currently being tested in two major hospitals in Kobe and Kyoto. It is capable of “whole-slide” analysis, meaning that it can analyze an entire microscope slide and identify the cells that might be cancerous. The software considers the color tone of the nucleus, its size and texture, and its overall roundness and can lead to earlier diagnoses by speeding up the process, ultimately allowing for more effective treatments for cancer patients.”

My experience at Scrambled Eggs – Studying English at the age of 50 is still possible.

One of our longest-serving students, Adele, has this year discovered a great passion… writing… in English. She has been coming to the school for lessons for over three years and has always enjoyed her lessons with us. This year however, her passion for English writing developed and now she feels confident enough to share her experiences with you as a blogger. Read below about Adele’s experience and enjoy her fantastic writing!

I started my experience at Scrambled Eggs three years ago.
I was searching for an English course to improve my knowledge, my listening and speaking skills, when among several schools the name of a school caught my attention, Scrambled Eggs, what a particular name for a school!
The smart and innovative method to teach using the interactive board seemed right for me. I thought it was too difficult to study with books for hours after work, so I found this new method nice and simple.
The thing that certainly convinced me was the location. To think of studying English before or after an appetizer or a drink in Navigli, such a good location, could transform going to school into a pleasure.
I started my group course with a lot of difficulties in speaking but also in relationships with other students.
For a woman of my age to interact with young students, talking about different topics and also about my life was not easy, but the friendly atmosphere that I found helped me a lot.
The teachers are young, nice, smiley, well prepared, motivated and very motivating.

(Adele, left, thinking about her first novel)

They have the ability to motivate you to do even better and doing my homework I discovered my new passion: writing.
I couldn’t believe it! I like writing and I like writing in English!
Of course I improved speaking and listening as well!
In the school, teachers come from different countries and in three years I have met all of them. I’ve learnt to understand American and English accents and with their attitude and their approach to teaching they have contributed to improving my listening.

I have experienced also one-to-one lessons that helped me not only learning English but many other things.

Now even if I’m still not able to totally understand videos and news on the radio, I’m satisfied, I have started to enjoy the language and my studying English has become a pleasure!
My speaking is still confused, and I have to improve it again and again and certainly I’ll continue on my path. With Scrambled Eggs? Of course!

The Flag of Sicily | English Vocabulary Challenge

At Scrambled Eggs, we are a very international team. Our teachers come from the USA and the UK and our reception team are Italians! Therefore, we love to learn about different cultures and share our national and regional differences. If you come to our school, in our main classroom, you will find all of the flags of Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA proudly displayed. In fact, we are a bit obsessed with the flags of different countries! But, as you know, even within Italy, there are many cultural differences and different histories also throughout the regions. One very distinct region is the island of Sicily. So, we thought we would take a look at this proud region’s flag and give you the opportunity to learn some new vocabulary at the same time. Read the information below and then try our quizzes!

The island of Sicily has a long and interesting history. It’s certainly not straight-forward anyway! Humans lived on the island even as far back as 12,000 BC. Then the Greeks came and it became the site of the Sicilian and Punic Wars. After the fall of Rome, Sicily was ruled by many different kingdoms, from the Vandals, the Ostrogoths, the Byzantines and then eventually the kingdoms of Naples and of Two Sicilies. Italian reunification brought the region into the new nation of Italy and after World War Two it was recognised as an autonomous region of the Italian Republic.

As well as an interesting history, Sicily is well-known for its fantastic natural landscapes. The island is roughly in the shape of a triangle and from beautiful beaches, hills, rivers and even volcanoes, Sicily has it all. It has a typical Mediterranean climate, with mild and wet winters and with hot and dry summers. Because of the fantastic history of the island, there are many historic monuments left for tourists to see, such as Greek and Roman temples. The historic centres of cities like Palermo and Catania are very enchanting, and walking through you feel like you are stepping back in time. The Sicilan cuisine is delightfully diverse and features different dishes such as cannoli and arancine.

The flag of Sicily is extremely interesting. It is very colourful, with a red and yellow background which represents the colours of the two cities Palermo and Corleone. The flag also features the head of a medusa with three legs. This and the wheat ears symbolise the fertility of the island because it such a good place to grow fresh food. The flag has taken many different forms in the past but the version of today has been used since 1990.

We hope you enjoyed reading about Sicily and it’s flag… Now try the quizzes below to test your knowledge of the meaning and the words in bold!

Flag of Sicily | Definitions Quiz

Match the word with the correct definition

Flag of Sicily | True or False

Decide if the statement is true or false