Exploring the World of Stinky Cheeses: A Whiff of Adventure!

Have you heard of stinky cheeses? Yes, those smelly ones your grandparents might have eaten. Don’t wrinkle your nose just yet – these cheeses might surprise you with their amazing flavors and textures. Let’s dive into the fascinating world of stinky cheeses and discover what makes them special.
First things first, why do they smell so much? The secret is bacteria – not the bad kind, though! One type of bacteria, b. linens is responsible for the smell. It’s the same bacteria that makes your sweat smell! But in cheese, it’s intentional and adds a unique aroma. The bacteria come from washing the cheese’s rind in salty brine or alcohol. That’s what gives these cheeses their special funkiness.

Now, let’s meet some of these cheesy champions:

Epoisses: This cheese is like the rockstar of stinkiness! People say it was banned from trains because of its strong smell. It’s soft and gooey when ripe, and it’s washed with brandy. Try it with sweet apricot jam for a taste explosion!

Ardrahan: Imagine the salty air from the sea turning into cheese. That’s Ardrahan for you! Made in Ireland, it has a sticky orange rind and comes in different flavors – from slightly tangy to nutty.

Affine au Chablis: This cheese is like Epoisses’ calm cousin. It’s washed in wine and has a bit of smell. Not too strong, though! Spread it on toast with jam for a morning treat.

Rush Creek Reserve: This cheese is wrapped in bark – like a cheesy present! It’s creamy and best enjoyed by spooning it out. The cheese maker in Wisconsin came up with the idea to use winter milk.

Taleggio: Italy brings us Taleggio, a cheese that’s not super stinky, but super tasty! It has a yeasty flavor and can be used in many ways – on sandwiches or even on pizzas.

Cowgirl Creamery Red Hawk: All the way from California, this cheese is like a flavor adventure. It’s creamy and gooey, and it gets better as it ages. Just like a good story!

Adapted from this article.

 

So, if you’re feeling brave and adventurous, give stinky cheeses a try. They might be smelly, but they’re also full of surprises and deliciousness. Just remember, the smellier the cheese, the more exciting the taste!

Stinky Cheeses Quiz:

FILL IN THE BLANK

AI Makes Plagiarism Hard to Detect According to Paper Written by Chatbot

Introduction:

ChatGPT has taken the world by storm and universities are worried that it will make students even lazier than they already are. But is it true? While the AI program has passed medical and legal exams, it still isn’t perfect. But then again, neither are people.

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. It plays a vital part in our lives and is important to keep up with.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds. That is, learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

That’s all for introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

AI & Plagiarism | Definition Match

Match the words to their correct definition.

AI & Plagiarism | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blanks with the correct words from the video.

AI & Plagiarism | True or False

Decide if each statement is true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Please leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text for AI Makes Plagiarism Hard to Detect According to Paper Written by Chatbot:

An academic paper entitled “Chatting and Cheating: Ensuring Academic Integrity in the Era of ChatGPT” published in an education journal described how artificial intelligence (AI) tools raise challenges and concerns, with respect to academic honesty and plagiarism.
Readers of that article (along with the peer reviewers who cleared it for publication) did not know that the paper itself had been written by the AI chatbot ChatGPT, which showed that it is writing at a very high level. Three professors from Plymouth University tipped off editors of the journal Innovations in Education and Teaching International. The four academics who peer-reviewed it assumed it was written by those three scholars.
Universities have been trying to banish the plague of essay mills selling pre-written essays to students trying to cheat the system. Now academics suspect even essay mills are using ChatGPT, and institutions admit they are racing to catch up with – and catch out – anyone passing off the popular chatbot’s work as their own.
Cheating your way to a degree might get you that first job, but you won’t do well and will likely fall behind over time.

Misophonia – When Sounds Make You Angry

Introduction:

Misophonia is when everyday sounds like chewing, crunching, yawning, sniffling, talking and tapping drive some people crazy. It’s not very common but it may explain a few things…

Watch the video and then do the accompanying English exercises below.

The news is a consistent and endless source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery. It plays a vital part in our lives and is important to keep up with.

There are many reasons to read, watch or listen to the news. Understanding the ramifications of recent legislation passed. Listening to recent events and grasping the potential consequences to your country. Or, simply listening to what’s happening in other countries so you can compare them to your own. It’s a staple in our lives and the most reliable way to get information.

That’s why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds. That is, learning English and keeping up with current events. We hope our challenging listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises bring these worlds together in a satisfactory and entertaining way.

That’s all for introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Quiz Time!

Misophonia | Definition Match

Match the words to their correct definitions.

Misophonia | Fill in the Blank

Fill in the blank with the correct word from the video.

Misophonia | True or False

Decide if each statement is true or false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Please leave any feedback you have in the comments section below. We would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full text for Misophonia – When Sounds Make You Angry:

Does the sound of someone chewing annoy you? Well, there may be a reason for that. Or does the sound of someone slowly sipping their tea tickle your nerves? Maybe they sniff a little louder than you’d like…
Research from King’s College London and the University of Oxford suggests 18.4% of the general UK population report that certain sounds cause problems for them – known as “misophonia.” It can trigger a strong negative reaction to common sounds, such as breathing, yawning, or the sound of someone tapping. The NHS says misophonia is specifically when certain sounds make people angry.
After looking at samples from 772 people – of different ages and ethnicities in the UK – the researchers found that only 13.6% of people had heard about the condition, and 2.3% identified as having it. The study also revealed that misophonia was equally common in men and women and that it tended to be less severe with age.
There are two forms of sensitive hearing. While misophonia causes emotional discomfort, hyperacusis causes physical discomfort. According to the NHS, hyperacusis is when everyday sounds sound louder than they should, which sometimes can become painful. If you have hyperacusis, you may be affected by sounds like a dog barking, a car engine, the sound of someone chewing, a vacuum cleaner or even coins jingling.
The NHS says that hyperacusis can affect one or both ears and can come suddenly or develop over time.