Learn English with the News – Reports of price hikes have been registered at bars, restaurants and hairdressers in Italy

Some of Italy’s shops and restaurants have added a “Covid Tax” in order to make more money after months of lockdown. Watch the video and then check out our website for the accompanying exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Reports of price hikes have been registered at bars, restaurants and hairdressers in Italy | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Reports of price hikes have been registered at bars, restaurants and hairdressers in Italy | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Reports of price hikes have been registered at bars, restaurants and hairdressers in Italy | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

“Italy’s consumers are being charged €2 to €4 more than before the coronavirus emergency as bars, restaurants and hairdressers add a ‘covid tax’ to the bill, according to consumer watchdog Codacons. Codacons has received dozens of reports on the increases in the price lists of hairdressers. Based on average costs in large cities, they have calculated how the price of a cut has gone from an average of €20 to €25, a rise of 25 per cent. Codacons also reports increases in the price of coffee at the bar, with cases of an espresso in Rome now costing €1.50 instead of the usual €1 or €1.10. In Milan the espressos are €2, up from €1.30. In Florence they are €1.70, up from the usual average of €1.40. The so-called covid tax has also been slammed by the National Consumer Union whose president Massimiliano Dona describes it as an “incorrect practice.” The hike in prices comes as many businesses struggle to get back to work after being closed for more than two months during the nationwide lockdown to contain the spread of the coronavirus. Businesses are operating amid reduced capacity due to social distancing as well as dealing with extra costs relating to sanification and protective equipment required under Italy’s Phase Two in the covid-19 emergency.”

Learn English with the News – Woman Gets Coveted Job of Russian Town’s Cat Chief

Not all news has to be serious! Today’s Learn English with the news deals with the newest administrative job in a small town in Russia: cat chief! Watch the video and do the accompanying exercises.

The news is a consistent source of entertainment, knowledge and discovery that never ceases to exist and always comes out with more and more material each day. Because it plays such a vital part in our lives and is so important to keep up with, it is without a doubt a piece of your everyday routine that can’t go ignored. 

Whether it is to understand the ramifications of recent legislation passed, to hear about recent events and grasp the potential consequences to your country, or simply hear about what is happening in other countries in order to compare them to what’s happening in yours, the news is certainly a staple in our lives and the most consistent way to get information.

This is why Scrambled Eggs has decided to unite two of your biggest worlds: learning English and keeping up with what is happening in the world. We hope our challenging daily exercises, composed of listening, vocabulary and comprehension exercises in English, will satisfy both of those above worlds in a satisfactory and also entertaining way.

So enough about introductions, let’s get to today’s Learn English with the News topic:

Adapted from this article.

Now that you’ve had a listen, let’s put your knowledge to the test with some of our vocabulary and comprehension exercises:

Woman Gets Coveted Job of Russian Town’s Cat Chief | Definition Match

Put the following words to the correct definitions.

Woman Gets Coveted Job of Russian Town’s Cat Chief | Fill in the Blank

Fill the empty spaces with the proper words.

Woman Gets Coveted Job of Russian Town’s Cat Chief | True or False

Indicate which sentences are true and which ones are false.

And that’s it for today’s English lesson, where you can improve your English with the news and current events. Do you have any comments or special requests for us for the next edition of Learn English with the News? Be sure to leave any feedback you have in the comments section below, as we would love to help you on your quest to learn the English language!

For other Learn English with the News segments, be sure to check out the rest of our posts:

https://scrambledeggsinglese.it/tag/learn-english-with-the-news/

Full Text:

“It was an unusual job advert. Wanted: Cat chief. Location: Zelenogradsk, Russia. Duties: Tending to the town’s approximately 70 stray cats. Some 80 applicants applied for the new role with the municipality in the small town in the Kaliningrad region, which has also erected a cat statue and added a feline to its emblem in a bid to rebrand itself as Russia’s foremost cat-loving community. In the end, local resident Svetlana Logunova was appointed guardian of the town’s felines. To help her with the task, she was given a bicycle and uniform, including a bright green jacket, black bow tie and hat. She has been given a budget of 5,700 roubles ($85) a month to ensure all the seaside community’s cats are happy, dishing out food, strokes and free rides in the basket on her bike. “I alone cannot care for every single one and a helping hand would go a long way,” Logunova said.”

5 Ways to Say Hello!

Se come me ti sei chiesto se ci siano altri modi per salutare in inglese oltre ai soliti “Hello”, “Hi”, “Hey, how are you?”, allora ti consiglio di dare un’occhiata qui sotto perché ne varrà la pena; imparerai nuovi modi espressivi e soprattutto non te ne rimarrai lì imbambolato come un pesce lesso quando un vero madrelingua inglese magari ti dirà: ‘Fancy seeing you here!’

Sono tutte, comunque, espressioni informali, da utilizzare nei luoghi adatti e nei contesti adeguati, con persone come parenti, amici o conoscenti con cui si ha una certa confidenza.

Quest’espressione può essere usata per esprimere una vera sorpresa nell’incontrare qualcuno in un luogo specifico. Ma è spesso usata in maniera sarcastica quando si incrocia qualcuno in un posto in cui ti aspettavi esattamente di trovarlo, come ad esempio trovare un amico che beve molto in un pub!

Quest’espressione è perfetta nei casi in cui non si veda qualcuno da molto tempo. Le sue origini sono da ricercare nell’inglese americano e, nonostante la sua struttura non grammaticalmente corretta, è ampiamente accettata da tutti come un’espressione fissa.

Ecco invece uno dei modi più comuni per iniziare una conversazione, diversa dai soliti ‘How are you?’ o ‘Are you OK?’ che ci hanno insegnato a scuola. Sebbene nessuno abbia preso in considerazione l’idea di insegnartelo finora, è una delle espressioni di gran lunga più utilizzate: se guardi qualche serie TV in lingua originale te ne accorgerai (a proposito, ecco qui i consigli per Netflix di Maggio 2020).

La nostra scuola di inglese non poteva far altro che suggerirtelo.

Quest’espressione di saluto è una contrazione colloquiale di ‘How do you do?’, anch’esso molto utilizzato. Ha preso piede mano mano nel sud-ovest rurale degli Stati Uniti, prima di diventare di utilizzo comune ai nostri giorni – anche se, probabilmente le sue origini sono ancora più lontane, risalenti forse fino al 1500 in Inghilterra.

Può essere un ottimo modo per salutare, stupendoli, i tuoi compagni del corso di inglese qui a Scrambled Eggs.

‘Che c’è?’ – ‘Che hai?’ – ‘Che succede?’: questa è la traduzione letterale di What’s up, anche se in realtà spesso è usatissimo semplicemente per salutare, senza intendere che qualcosa non vada. È appunto un modo per salutare che può essere utilizzato in entrambe le situazioni.
Acusticamente vi ricorda qualcosa? C’è un’app molto popolare che gioca su questo termine! ?